Laminate Flooring Repair Question


  #1  
Old 11-11-05, 12:54 PM
WBGirl
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Unhappy Laminate Flooring Repair Question

Hi!

We installed laminate flooring in a large section of our home - kitchen, living room, hallway, one bedroom. However, the sealing never got completed!

This morning it was discovered that we have a problem. Water was spilled and not promptly wiped up. Thus we now have at least four planks that are warped, all along the seam.

I searched online and have been so far disappointed. I am finding that I would have to hire a professional to fix it. One issue I have with us fixing it is that Lowe's is apparently either out of or no longer carrying this color of flooring we purchased way back this spring.

Any tips? I was thinking one way to do things would be to sand it down flat - but I wasn't sure how that would end up looking? We are wanting to correct this ASAP as we are moving next month and renting our house!

Thank you!!!
 
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Old 11-11-05, 03:08 PM
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what "sealing" are you talking about?

you can't sand down laminate flooring. it's not wood. it's a picture of wood glued to a cardboard substrate with clear stuff on top.

you don't have ANY extra planks left over from your installation? none?? if you bought it as recently as last spring, someone somewhere surely still has some of it.
 

Last edited by Annette; 11-14-05 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 11-11-05, 03:21 PM
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As to sealing - I was told we would have to seal the edges plus the seams with sealant (whatever it was, we bought it, just never used it!). Is that wrong? I'm thinking yes it's wrong because of the situation we are in now! LOL

I know it is fake wood, I was just thinking of what could or couldn't be done. No, we don't have any left over. (I think the guys used what was left over on the stairs) I am going to go searching around to find some - I should have figured we would need some, especially in cases like this!
 
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Old 11-11-05, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Annette
it's a picture of wood glued to a cardboard substrate with clear stuff on top.

What a great explanation!
 
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Old 11-11-05, 04:13 PM
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Your insurance might this sort of thing. At least it does when you get water in the subfloor under lino. My sister's dishwasher leaked and she had her whole main floor lino replaced with insurance.
I know this is hacky but if the insurance thing doesnt work and you can't find exact replacements, and you dont have tons of money, perhaps you could swap some boards out of a closet or in some inconspicous place. Then replace those boards with some of similiar coloring etc.
Probably, whoever you bought the boards from can order some more or very similiar.
Good luck.
 
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Old 11-11-05, 06:34 PM
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I always recommend to my clients they purchase extra cartons of flooring, just for this case. Laminates are discontinued on a weekly basis.

You can use a "T" molding and have a different laminate in that room, or a closet like mentioned above.
 
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Old 11-11-05, 07:22 PM
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We do have a closet that was done just for the heck of it - so I'm sure we could take it out of there.

My husband disagrees though - because of the area the problem is. In the living room, we have a rug and the problem is on the edge of that. I suppose one could get a larger rug and cover it up? My husband said (professional that he is LOL) in order to fix it, we would have to take the floor out in the way that it was put in - which I disagree with and think there has to be another way. I was reading online that it is best to hire a professional in cases like these - what is the thinking on that?

Thanks for all of your replies, I appreciate them all.
 
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Old 11-11-05, 07:36 PM
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Some laminates can be back laid. Some more difficult to do it then others.


You can even cut those planks out and T&G modification and glue in new planks without taking the whole floor up.
 
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Old 11-11-05, 09:13 PM
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That is my ideal - to cut them out and put in new planks.

Do you think this could be accomplished regardless of if we use glue or not? We didn't use glue when we installed.

TIA.


Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright
Some laminates can be back laid. Some more difficult to do it then others.

You can even cut those planks out and T&G modification and glue in new planks without taking the whole floor up.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 08:56 AM
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You will have to use glue, as you will be cutting off the lock on the T&G, to get the replacement plank in. Unless you pull the flooring up to that point and install the new and relay the rest of the flooring.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 05:03 PM
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CDW also mentioned that its may be easy to pull up a few rows and re-install, depending upon the laminate type.
I have removed and re-installed laminate in a few minutes to replace a board or cut in a heat vent or two that someone else (not possibly me), may have forgotten.
You might consider how hard it would be to pull up the rows. If you are close to the wall and have uncomplicated rows, it might be very easy to remove the baseboard and a few rows. The laminate I have worked with could be installed from either edge so it doens't necessarly need to be removed in the order it was installed.
 
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Old 11-15-05, 03:10 PM
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Thanks everyone,

We will have to cut it out because of where it is at - the center of the room and difficult to remove everything to get to it. Ah, a difficult lesson!

Thanks again.
 
 

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