laminate flooring & stone hearth


  #1  
Old 12-17-05, 08:46 PM
Dave Mon
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laminate flooring & stone hearth

So I'm laying laminate flooring in my TV room. I was going to simply lay some trim around the stone hearth to hide where the flooring butts up against the edges of the stone, but the stone has a very rough and uneven edge, making the trim look awful. It almost looks better to leave the cut edges exposed, but I'd feel like I was copping out if I did that. Rather than tacking and sealing the cut edge, does anyone have any creative suggestions for me to give this some sort of finished appearance? It seems my DIY jobs around the house are always 98% done, and always missing that finishing touch. I'm tired of that and I'd like this one to be different.
 
  #2  
Old 12-17-05, 10:26 PM
Dave Mon
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nevermind

OK I'm an idiot. I found the thread. Now to find a way to rent an angle grinder on a Sunday...

Or I guess I could buy the cheapest one at HD.
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-05, 02:06 AM
J
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Try to get one with a dry cut diamond blade. You can use an abrasive type masonry blade but they don't last long so get extras.

I have found that that Roto-Zip spiral saw with the diamond blade attachment works very well too.

After you make the cut be real careful on chiseling it out. Two cuts are better, one at the set height and one down on the floor but its not mandatory.

Wear good safety glasses and a long sleeve shirt. Drape a big piece of plastic over you and have a shop vac hose run in there with you.

Turn the shop vac on, I have forgot to do that part more than once .

PS - and a good respirator or dust mask too.
 

Last edited by Jerry T; 12-18-05 at 02:09 AM. Reason: Dust mask
  #4  
Old 12-18-05, 10:14 AM
Dave Mon
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Thanks. Would tacking down the ends of interlocking laminate flooring boards give me trouble in the long run? I've heard it does, just want to be sure.
 
  #5  
Old 12-18-05, 01:05 PM
J
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You heard right Dave, that entire floor has to be able to float and move a little as if it were one big piece.
 
  #6  
Old 12-19-05, 10:17 AM
Dave Mon
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Crap. I guess I have really cheap stone. I've had a few pieces chip off while cutting the top line. I'm still on the side that's hidden by a certain angle, so I may just butt the rest up and caulk it, since nobody would know any better anyway.
 
  #7  
Old 12-19-05, 10:49 AM
M
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I don't know what you have for tools but here is another suggestion. Leave your gap like you would against the wall. take something a little thicker than standard molding like 1" or 5/4" stock. lay it against the hearth by hand and scribe the shape of the stone onto the lumber. Then use a coping saw, jig, saw, scroll saw or whatever you have to cut along the line. Use a belt sander for the extra small cuts instead of the saw.

Good luck!
 
  #8  
Old 12-26-05, 11:24 AM
Dave Mon
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That's exactly what I wound up doing. I stuck a piece of tracing paper on the ground with one edge flush against the hearth and, holding my pencil straight up and down, I traced along the stone enough to cover the width of one plank. Then I got busy with the jigsaw and Dremel (don't have a belt-sander). Then I sealed it with a matching-color caulk. It looks much better than I thought it would. Not what I preferred, but I can't say it bothers me.
 
 

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