Carpet Transition Strips


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Old 02-24-06, 09:20 PM
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Carpet Transition Strips

I recently finished a Pergo Laminate floor in the Kitchen and dining room. I'm in the process of trimming it out now. The kitchen and dining room adjoin the living room, and I'm really having trouble with the Pergo Carpet transition strips. I really think these things are pieces of crap! Anyone share that opinion? Even though I followed the directions, they did not go in too well.

The metal "grabber" strip ended up too low even though the directions said I didn't need to shim it for my thickness of floor. The strips went in badly, and the tang busted off on the ends. Even if they would have went in perfectly, I would not have been happy with them. They look like some cheezy trailer-house junk to me.

So what options do I have? I was thinking about milling something similar out of Oak and nailing it down. Anyone here ever make their own strips?

TIA,
Joe Michel
 
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Old 02-25-06, 01:21 AM
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I despise those 4in1 transitions. Many times I will use transitions made for the thin engineered hardwood or from a different brand of laminate if i can match the color.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 07:18 PM
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Update:

I milled my own carpet transison strips out of 3/4" x 2-1/8" solid Oak. They turned out awesome! Not only do they look much better, but I got a single board that was 14ft long, so I could do the long side in one piece. Total cost: $24.00! Sure beats 18 bucks a pop for that ugly Pergo stuff, and I needed 3 of them. Too bad I wasted 60.00 on those pieces of crap.

Joe Michel
 
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Old 02-26-06, 08:27 PM
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I have to agree that they are tricky to install. They are based on a perfect world scenario. We seldom will use the bottom inserts choosing instead to just use a good construction adhesive and weighing the product overnight. We choose those types of product often, as to try and custom stain raw stock can be tricky and time consuming.

If you want to use the bottom inserts, working from left to right seems to work in most cases.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Rotty
I have to agree that they are tricky to install. They are based on a perfect world scenario. We seldom will use the bottom inserts choosing instead to just use a good construction adhesive and weighing the product overnight. We choose those types of product often, as to try and custom stain raw stock can be tricky and time consuming.

If you want to use the bottom inserts, working from left to right seems to work in most cases.
I agree that making and staining your own is tricky and time consuming. It worked out well in my case because my house is new construction and we have not moved in yet - so I had the time to get it right. I also already knew what brand and type of stain all the trim in the house was done with, so that was easy too.

Joe Michel
 
 

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