can old carpet padding be used under laminate?


  #1  
Old 02-28-06, 10:37 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Question can old carpet padding be used under laminate?

Hi,

I'm planning to replace old carpet with Harmonics laminate floor . Since it's a condo, I'm going to use:
1) rubber-sound protection as underlayment to reduce the noise
and
2) Harmonics underfloor for moisture barrier

My question is: Can I leave old carpet padding and install my underlayment and laminate over that padding? Is it a good idea? what are pros and cons for it? Would it add additional sound protection?

Please advise!
 
  #2  
Old 03-01-06, 06:56 AM
JPicasso's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 324
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
No. You cannot use carpet padding for laminate underlayment. There is a thread a ways back
where this was done with disasterous results.

I would contact the manufacturer and see if they have any suggestions for underlayment. You should get in writing that any noise-softening underlayment you are going to use will not lead to failure of the floor.
 
  #3  
Old 03-01-06, 01:11 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
laminate underlayment

Thank you for your response,

I've talk to Harmonics and they cannot advise any outside product, but they clearly mention that I will lose teh warranty if I use something other than they provided.

Still, I'm very concern about the noise and have purchased Acoustical Subflorinng for one room to try. Here is the link http://www.soundprooffoam.com/acoust...html#grayback1

It was recommended to me by several people and now I'm realy not sure if i can use it under the laminate.

Any thoughts or recommendations?

Thank you.
 
  #4  
Old 03-01-06, 09:11 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 75
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've seen the product and save your money and don't bother. Ratings of laminate pad are based upon 10" of concrete, which is classified as 100. (astm e492) There is a product called micro son, made from recycled tires, which has a sound rating of 63 FIIC. The product is 3.5mm thick and is generally recognized as a pad which lasts a lifetime.

Generally, with pads like that sound transmissions are greatly reduced, however, bear in mind that sound will transmit through acoustical leaks (at wall, floor and ceiling joints). By sealing the leaks, you are better off and don't have a lot of extra height to worry about.

Secondly, you may also consider using 6mm cork, which is as far as I'm concerned the best. Again fill the acoustical leaks.

Hope this helps.

Hans, Gov't certified installer
 
  #5  
Old 03-02-06, 11:01 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Question how to seal acoustical leaks?

You suggested to seal acoustical leaks to reduce sound transmissions. I don't know much about that. Could you give me more details on how to do it, where exactly, what material to use for sealing, etc.

Thanks!!!
 
  #6  
Old 03-02-06, 02:42 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 75
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Where the subfloor meets the drywall, there usually is a gap, left there for expansion. Seal that with a expanding Styrofoam available at a lumber yard. Light fixtures also have a space around them, seal them also.

Sound passes through a solid medium very well, however if the sound needs to travel from one material to another, through another, the amount of reduction is related to the density of the products, as long as it doesn't move in response to the sounds. When you walk on a wooden floor, the sound hits the wall, and all walls are somewhat flexible, and will radiate the sound. The same can be said for the pad under the laminated floor. By reducing the flexibility or resiliency of the pad, the sound transmission is greatly reduced. That's why we prefer to recommend cork as an underpad, the cork is non resilient and low in density. Second is the reclaimed car tires, very little resiliency or movement.

Hope this helps
Hans, Gov't certified installer
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: