Gaps and delamination in engineered wood floor


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Old 03-09-06, 07:21 PM
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Gaps and delamination in engineered wood floor

Just had 450 sf of Bruce maple 5" engineered wood flooring installed by local contractor. The floor was glued to Phoenix concrete slab. Installer said moisture test was about 4 as I recall. How much gap is acceptable? Some people say "none", but that seems impossible. Upon close inspection there are quite a few gaps that are not even dime width, but about and some thicker than a small olfa utility blade. Should these gaps be addressed by the installer in any way? I was expecting this "High Quality" professionally installed flooring to come out as tight as the HD TrafficMaster laminate I installed myself in the kids bedrooms.

Also, it seems one board has delaminated along the long end - center. The floor is completely installed now. How should the contractor handle this?

Thanks, LJ
 
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Old 03-09-06, 07:33 PM
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Bruce and High quality should never be used in the same sentence, unless it is Studio B, from Bruce.

A gapped floor is pretty common with Bruce, who is the only manufacturer that I have seen, state in their installation specs, wood filler must be used.


A board replacement is needed to get the bad board out. What did he use to get "4" ans a concrete moisture reading? 3# per 1000 sq.ft is the limit, with a CC test.
 
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Old 03-09-06, 07:55 PM
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At over $5/sf and compared to the others on display... it seemed... well, what is a good engineered wood? And how much does THAT cost?

As far as the moisture, I may be mistaken about the number, he just mentioned it before installing the floor. He said it was dry. That was good enough for me - what do I know - that's why I hired a contractor. Could this be a factor so soon?

How do they replace the board without tearing back to it?
 
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Old 03-09-06, 08:07 PM
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Well, Studio B is around $9 to $12 a sq.ft depending who sells it to you.
Mirage is about $7-$9 a sq.ft depending who sells it to you.


The installer knows how to do a board replacement. No need to write a book about it here. Cut the board out and insert a new board after modification of the groove sides.
 
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Old 03-09-06, 09:04 PM
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Thanks. Should I have him do anything about the gaps, or is that just the nature of the product?
 
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Old 03-11-06, 05:37 AM
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A gapped floor is pretty common with Bruce, who is the only manufacturer that I have seen, state in their installation specs, wood filler must be used.
 
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Old 03-12-06, 10:10 AM
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Unhappy

We've seen specs from Mannington on some of their engineered as well as the stuff that comes from China, stating that "some wood will need filler".

It's a bugger, they leave everything into the installer's pocket to fix their products. Then it's hard to convince the customer that this is a "normal" procedure!!".
 
 

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