New Floor Rubbing Bottom of Metal Door


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Old 03-21-06, 10:23 PM
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New Floor Rubbing Bottom of Metal Door

I'm hoping some of you will share your experience with me to help me get out of a jam. Sorry in advance if this is a long post. I picked up some 3/8" engineered maple that I intend to float in my dining room and kitchen. I planned to float some directly over existing vinyl flooring in parts of the rooms, and other over Quiet Walk underlayment. When I laid out a few pieces tonight to check if there was clearance under the front door which opens into the room, you can guess what happened: the door rubs against the floor, enough so that it doesnt open easily. Right in front of this door there is currently a 4' x 4' area of vinyl on the floor which I was planning to float the floor on top of.
Here's what I was thinking:
-If I remove the vinyl to gain clearance, then I'd have to still put an underlayment below it so I wouldn't gain any space.
-I can't cut the door down because it is metal and has a very narrow rubber weather stripping on the bottom. If I remove the rubber then the door isnt weatherproof and the floor could get wet.

What can I do to make this work? I can post a picture if it helps.

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 11:06 PM
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We ran into a similar problem, with the following remedy. Because you are using engineered flooring, in front of the door, glue the flooring directly down to the slab to give the door clearance. That way you don't need the under cushion. Now, when you get the floor far enough away from the problem door, double stick,(glue the pad and the engineered wood) for about 2 feet. That will eliminate movement because of the height difference from no pad to pad. Then float.

Now, that doesn't mean that you have to start the install at the door, you can do this when you get to that area.

The idea and theory being that the floor will expand now in only one direction, so proper expansion space is imperative.

We've done this several years ago, with no call backs.

Hope this helps.
 

Last edited by Rotty; 03-22-06 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 03-22-06, 09:22 AM
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Thanks for the help. Would the transition from the glued to the floating portion of the floor feel strange to walk on or have any problems due to the height difference? What type of adhesive should I use to glue the floor to the underlayment and the underlayment to the concrete?
 
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Old 03-22-06, 10:37 AM
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Rotty, that is the worst advise yet!

Never glue down any part of a floating floor. Locking in a floater is suicidal!

I'll suggest Congleum's DuraCeramic at the entry doors. You'll be hard pressed to tell if it is not the real deal. You'll need walk off mats to keep damage at the entry doors in check.

Or you can remove the entry door, casing and all without too much damage, and move the whole thing up. You may have to modify the header in the framing.
 
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Old 03-22-06, 11:08 AM
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Well, we've done it with no problems! When I took the Khars course, they even mentioned that in some instances they've seen installers staple locking system floors. When asked about the consequences, the engineers at Khars stated that as long as there is room for expansion, they didn't see a problem. They don't like it, however.

We started double gluing snap engineered a number of years ago, in an apartment with a hump in the middle of the room. We couldn't remove the hump as it was a wire strung building. We locked in the middle with adhesive (about 16 sq. ft.) and floated the rest of the suite. That was 4 years ago. BTW, the suite faces west, so it will expand and contract quite a bit. We took a risk with no problems in 4 years.

When I taught the Apprenticeship course at a local collage, one of the issues that I tried to teach the students was this Paradimal approach to laying the floors. We directly glue snap systems to stairs with no problems, think of it as a large step.

Now I'm not stating to glue an entire area with snap, however a small area seems to work, at least in our case.
 
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Old 03-22-06, 11:49 PM
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Back to the matter at hand...

Both of you are obviously coming into this with different experiences, and I am going to look into both options, although having a 4' square area in front of the door be ceramic and the rest wood may look strange as it isn't that big a room.

If I am gluing the pad and wood down in this area what adhesive would be recommended?

Thanks for your advice.
 
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Old 03-23-06, 02:38 AM
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It might work but you will be voiding the entire floor warranty if you proceed. And there will be no space for a walk off door mat and that will be trouble in bad weather.

Can you raise the entire door unit up?
 
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Old 03-23-06, 06:35 AM
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I install a lot of doors, and as I see it, you either need to leave a 40x40 area of vinyl, with edging around your new floor, or else you need to remove the entire door, as Perry mentioned- frame and all, raise it up about 3/4" and reinstall it. On a new install, when you know there is going to be raised flooring inside, you lay the appropriate thickness of plywood down first (to shim the door up), then install the door on top of that. As mentioned, you want to have room for a rug in front of the door too.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 12:39 PM
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Thanks to all for the advice. I'm frustrated that the door was installed with so little clearance below it, it was just finished being built only two weeks ago so I'm not inclined to pull the door out and raise it up, and I'm pretty sure the HOA would have a fit.
The tile entry may be the way I have to go, it sounds like DuraCeramic is a low profile tile that would fit beneath the door? What kind of transition would look best when going from the engineered wood to the DuraCeramic? I would like to have the boards just end cleanly at the tile, but with I floating installation I don't think that's an option.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 07:27 PM
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An end cap molding, butted to the edge of the DuraCeramic, not on top of it.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 09:57 PM
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Just a thought...

Why not just buy another door? If this door is fire rated, then you obviously can't cut the bottom off it (or a little off the top and bottom).

That would be a heck of a lot easier, and smarter imho, then trying to reframe everything. Think about that. How would you accomplish this without MAJOR destruction of the existing drywall?

Just something to think about. I'm not sure where this door is, or if it is absolutley necessary, regardless of the code, to have it be metal.

Gluing down a floating floor would make me a little uneasy. The finish carpenter that installed my cabinets was giving me 'advice', and said I only needed to allow expansion on ONE side of the room, not on all sides.....

I guess there's a reason why he's a finish carpenter and not a flooring guy.

Good luck.
 
 

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