To Get Started (Laminate Floor Installation)


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Old 04-28-06, 03:15 PM
J
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To Get Started (Laminate Floor Installation)

I'm in the process of rebuilding my home from damages caused by Hurricane Katrina last year. I'm wanting to install laminated flooring for my living room and hallway. Even though I can hire someone to do this, I believe I'll have to do this on my own if I want a decent job done. I'm an Electrician, so I'm not totally ignorant about tools or measurements. I hired a crew to do sheetrock and paint and the money I spent and the work that they ended up with, I feel I can do a better job by taking my time and being thorough. Everyone here is blow & go and not taking the time to do it right. Is there anyone, who can help me get started. I've already pulled up all the tackboards from the carpet strips and cleaned the floor area as best as I can get it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 04-28-06, 04:27 PM
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You will first need to shop around and take a look at laminate (plastic) and engineered wood (laminated wood with real wood veneer). The floating floor products are popular for easier DIY installation. There are also nail and staple down and glue down products. You will need to pick a product that offers the type of installation with which you feel comfortable. You will also want to buy the best quality that your budget will allow in a look that compliments your decor. Usually it is recommended that you go with a name-brand manufacturer that offers good, better, best levels of quality and installation and select the best you can afford.

Each manufacturer tends to have its own very specific instructions for subfloor prep, vapor retarders over concrete, underlayment, acclimation to temperature and humidity before installation, and installation procedures. Follow these carefully to maintain warranty.
 
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Old 04-28-06, 04:31 PM
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You are absolutely right about doing it yourself!

So...you want to know what the next step is right? (just wondering)

Have you choosen your laminate already or in the process of?

Do you have any specific questions?

Oh, and like twelvepole mentioned about the best manufacturers, also go with one that will give you a long term warranty. Don't go for the cheapest in town or on-line as you tend to get what you pay for.
 
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Old 04-28-06, 05:12 PM
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Thanks for your quick responses . I haven't purchased any of the laminate flooring yet and I have 340' square feet to cover. I'm going with something from pergo or american floors Floating would probably be better for being a small area and easier installation based on my inexperience with floors. I'm not so easily swayed buying anything cheap, but rather seeking good quality by best competitive pricing, Lowe's and Home Depot are always giving20% off on some quality lines (They're beat each others prices if you show them the other's prices). I figured that I would start asking the questions now so that I don't miss any important steps.

Is there anything more I need to do before I pick up the floors?
 
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Old 04-28-06, 08:38 PM
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Not a pro but I've put in a few floors. Here's my limited observations.

On a couple floors, the boards locked/clicked lenghtwise but were tapped together on the ends. I don't like those because they have a tendancy to seperate and tapping the ends causes some chips. I have also installed floors with clicking ends and lengths. I feel these are better quality and thats reflected in the price.

I have found that the transition strips are a significant cost that gets overlooked. Make sure they have some in stock or order them when you buy the laminate so you are not waiting weeks to finish the floor.

Personally I like the 8mm thick pieces and my wife likes the floors that have some texture to them. You can also get ceramic tiles style floors. I like those. My sister has tile laminate throughout halls and kitchen. She loves them.

I'm putting in a floor right now in a rental place. The stuff was very cheap on sale tile style but it has a glue/click system. The pieces are pre-glued and you wet them with a special applicator. I start this job tomorrow but I have a feeling it might not work very well.
 

Last edited by mjd2k; 04-30-06 at 11:08 AM.
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Old 05-02-06, 05:27 AM
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I found the link below to be quite informative, (it's a pretty long read). I agree with MJD2K on the clicking styles and transition/trim piece costs. I've also found that the premium underlayment pads versus the budget pads seem to be worth their expense (quieter to walk on and better feel). I've read a lot of negative feedback concerning the "Edge" brand of ceramic tile laminate. Do a search on that if you're considering this style of laminate. Be sure to undercut any door jambs so your flooring will slide underneath and look real clean. Also, be sure to completely read the mfrs install directions, as they're all a little different. Take your time and good luck!

http://www.ifloor.com/articles/lam/lamwars2.html
 
 

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