leveling subfloor question ??


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Old 05-24-06, 04:35 PM
K
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Exclamation leveling subfloor question ??

Hey Guys, Im still at it (700sq ft of laminate) and getting close to the end. However, I am doing this one section at a time, pulling up carpet one section at a time. This last week, I have removed the last piece of carpet to discover I have a beam under the floor which causes the hallway to be unlevel by about 1-2 inches. I have applied a leveling compound, approx 30 pounds and have nailed 1/4 inch plywood over it. Since I have done this, there is still a slight bulge where the beam ends and the hallway begins. Should I apply more leveling compound over the plywood area? I have dry planked some this area and simply put a piece of the pergo box under the laminate. It seems to have solved the problem. Should I finish planking it over and leave it there? Does anyone know of any potential problems from doing this?
Karl
 
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Old 05-25-06, 08:12 AM
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What ever it takes to get it done!!

Sometime you have to cut out the subfloor and plane down the beam, then sister and dead wood, to replace the cut out subfloor.
 
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Old 05-25-06, 08:55 AM
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Lightbulb Thanks for the info, Perry!

Im not shure if the bulge is big enough to justify the work and expense of removing the subfloor and planeing the beam.
The level says its level. I can feel the bulge as I walk accross it with bare feet. Much less noticible with tennis shoes. If I stare at it, I can see it (a prominent seam). Sometimes I think my mind is playing tricks on me though. I decided against the cardbord box. Too squishy and too much of a drop off. It seems that newspaper is a better choice. I think I will go with it unless anyone else has a better idea. When im ready to sell the house, I dont want any potential buyers to come in and say " whats this bulge?" AKAevan has a good question about feathering with paper. I would be interested in more responses to his question.
Karl
 
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Old 05-25-06, 08:33 PM
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Level doesn't mean a thing in our business. Flat, has everything to do with it.

Don't get the two terms confused. They don't mean the same thing.
 
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Old 05-27-06, 07:18 AM
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Hard to see flat.

My wife suggested I place a ball on the floor. I thought this a pretty good idea.
 
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Old 05-27-06, 08:09 AM
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I think a ball might give you a general idea but as CDW said, flat is more important than level and a ball will take the gravity route.

I've done a bit of this and I used a 4 foot level. Something longer would have been better for some rooms. The straight edge lets you immediatly see the exact paramaters of your dips and rises which makes modifications easier and more exact.

I just did a bathroom floor that is still 2 inches unlevel within 7 feet but I used shingles etc to make it flat. A ball would have been useless to me as it would have rolled right out of the room.
 
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Old 05-27-06, 04:21 PM
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Up at the top of the thread list is a "sticky" titled concrete floor prep. Click on it and see how to check for flatness.
 
 

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