Hardwood over Hardwood?


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Old 08-15-06, 12:31 PM
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Hardwood over Hardwood?

I'm buying a 1925 bungalow that has hardwood floors. Some of the hardwood has been damaged by termites and also there are some replaced boards.

Is is it possible to lay hardwood over the existing hardwood floors? Or does this need to be removed.

Or, should i have the floors repaired and refinished?
 
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Old 08-22-06, 02:44 PM
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Cool

I have a similar situation. Ours is a 1912 with wood floors that need replacing - oversanded, bad board end alignment when old air vents were removed, etc. Not to mention sag in many places and in many directions.

The question is: lay new wood floor over existing (maple strip) floors, or tear out the maple first (which would still leave the waves http://forum.doityourself.com/images/icons/icon6.gif). We would MUCH prefer laying on top of the existing. Height re doors, hot water baseboard heat, etc. is not a problem.

Help!?
 
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Old 08-22-06, 04:19 PM
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As long as you go the opposite direction or at a 45 to the existing, you will be fine, but don't go the same direction as the existing.
 
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Old 08-22-06, 05:18 PM
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We pulled up 2" oak strip flooring in our 1910 house and it was so easy to do. A pry bar and a hammer. It's amazing how long those strips were....up to 14'. We salvaged what was usable and plan to lay it elsewhere.

The good thing about pulling up the old flooring, especially if you have water or termite damage, is you can inspect the condition of the subflooring, make repairs, foam insulate around baseboards and level as needed.

If you're worried about it being labor intensive, it's not. We're in our 60's/70's and pulled it up ourselves in a few hours. We have 3/4 " tongue and groove subfloor, so we just hammered in the nail heads that were sticking up after strip removal.

Our floor was so out of level with the adjoining foyer that we now have the 3/4" T/G sub, 1/2 " plywood, 1/2" durarock. It's level and looks great.
 
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Old 08-23-06, 04:59 AM
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Smile

Originally Posted by houserehab
It's level and looks great.
That is good news.

Was the floor level overall (not just a mismatch in heights between rooms)?

How does one deal with 94 years of settling that has not been attended to?
 
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Old 08-23-06, 09:54 AM
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it leaned in 2 opposite directions and was unlevel between 2 rooms. Center fireplace, lack of support in crawl space and a crushed sill plate on on exterior wall were the cause.

We had the floor cut loose, leveled and redone, along with sill repair. Most old houses have settling. Our room heights varied from 1/4" to 1 1/2 ". Not a great deal, but enough to give you vertigo

Knowing what I know now, I would have pulled up the strip flooring to see what I was dealing with BEFORE any repairs were made underneath. The HW floors were worthless anyway, in the way, and they kept us in a guessing game as to the condition of the subfloor. We could have saved ourselves alot of $ in unneeded leveling had we seen what we had to work with.

Our town is filled with 100's of old houses and the old timers swear by roofing shingles to level small dips in floors. You'd have to google it to see which way they lay the shingles (I forget), but they seat well and don't compact. For the dips we had, we could have done that instead.

We laid pergo in the past 2 days and had no problem with unlevel spots. Walls running out was a different story

Don't be afraid of your new old home. Live there awhile and see exactly what it needs. Be leery of local handymen and contractors that want to turn it into a "new" home. They will rob you blind with all their opinions and can do more damage than good.

I'd find out how extensive the termite damage is and take it from there. Our state has horrible soil and even new homes have settling issues. For these old houses to still be standing after 75+ years attests to the durability of the old growth woods they used.

PS - initially we had a house leveling company try to lift the dip. Big MISTAKE. These old houses are many times locked into their current position from years of settling. They were jacking away (in the wrong areas on top of it!) and when I heard a loud boom upstairs, I made them stop. Ran to the attic and found a cracked rafter. In the end, all the leveling company did is BOW the subfloor.

Like I said, they can do alot of damage. Be careful and take your time. Your pocket book will thank you.
 
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Old 08-23-06, 11:42 AM
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Thanks again - very helpful.

One good thing here is that it is so cold we don't have termites at all. One less thing to worry about. Of course when it gets to 40 below I may not be here either.
 
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Old 08-23-06, 05:24 PM
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no problem. Happy to help. Us old house owners need all the tips we can get.
 

Last edited by mattison; 08-23-06 at 05:41 PM. Reason: Links to outside forums are not allowed.
  #9  
Old 03-29-07, 10:52 AM
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Question

Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright
As long as you go the opposite direction or at a 45 to the existing, you will be fine, but don't go the same direction as the existing.

I know this is an old thread, but using the search option before making my first post.

Can you tell me why I can't run in the same direction, and what would happen if I did?

I just ripped up the floor in the kitchen and found that half of the kitchen has existing hardwood and the other half has lino over I don't even know what to call it. It's not a particle board, but it's a porous type subfloor. There is a small landing into the living room and all the boards run the same way. I want to only replace the boards in the kitchen because they are not in great shape. I'd obviously like to maintain the same direction.

Any ideas. I've tried a small diagram below.

oooooo======= <---sliding door
oxxxxxx!!!!!!! wall
oxxxxxx!!X!!! wall
oxxxxxx!!!!!!! wall
oooooo!!!!!!!!!!stairs down
-------!!!!!!!!!!stairs down
!!!!!!!!![!!!!!!! stairs up
!!!!!!!!![!!!!!!! stairs up
!!!!!!!!!------small landing into living room
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! wall
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! wall
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! wall
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! wall
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! wall
---------=== <--- front door
where
x = lino over ?
o = cabinets
! = harwood planks
- = wall between kitchen and living room and the landing step
[ = other side of landing
= = doors


The main source of light is the large X and the rear sliding door
 
 

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