direction of laminate floor


  #1  
Old 08-23-06, 10:51 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
direction of laminate floor

Is it okay to lay planks in one direction in Dining Room (South to North) and another direction in adjoining room (West to East) seperated by T molding?, or would it look better to maintain one direction (all front to back (West to East)

The house is entered from the West. After entering the foyer which is ceramic tile the dining room is entered by turning left (North) through a 52" opening. It is 16' (South to North) and 11.5" (West to East) . All windows are on West side. At the North end on the East side is a 32" opening (no door) where I will put T molding and lay planks perpendicular (West to East) in the adjoing room. All other areas of the house will be Front to back (West to East)
 
  #2  
Old 08-23-06, 12:31 PM
thall
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Laminate direction

I have laid quite a bit of laminate and would have to suggest keeping it all in the same direction. I think it is a matter of preference and what you are happy with however if you want to maintain a professional uniform look I would keep it the same.
 
  #3  
Old 08-25-06, 12:00 PM
Annette's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,155
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
the hardwood floors in our house (entry, hall, kitchen, family room) are all running the same continuous direction.

i don't see a reason you couldn't switch directions, though.

but why? what's that "adjoining room"? why does it need to run differently in there?
 
  #4  
Old 08-27-06, 11:08 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Across or the same direction?

Just Wondering,,,
When you're laying this flooring, shouldn't you lay it in the opposite direction as the floor joysts (not sure of the spelling on this). ?
What I've been told is that if the floor joysts are running east and west, then you should lay your floor north and south, (across the joysts). Supposedly this will help with the floor "giving" and make it stronger.
 
  #5  
Old 08-27-06, 11:26 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,816
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Most recommend laying perpendicular to the joists. Joists provide support for flooring.
 
  #6  
Old 08-27-06, 11:49 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Wink Good Advice,,

So,,, I guess for once I was given good advice...
 
  #7  
Old 08-28-06, 08:03 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,073
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yes, it is always a good Idea to run across the joist, unless you add more plywood to strengthen the substrate, then you can go with the joists.
 
  #8  
Old 08-28-06, 09:46 PM
E
Member
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Linden
Posts: 4
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Laminate Direction?

I never make it an issue when its laminate as to direction with or against the joists and I have to warrant install for life of floor. We sell approx. 1000 sq ft./ week. I believe with laminate as opposed to wood that direction is a personal preference. You could break it with a t, but normally it all runs the same. Laminate does not add a lot of weight on the floor, so direction vs. joists will not make a difference in the real world. Hope this helps.

Jaa
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-28-06 at 09:59 PM. Reason: removed personal information/this is not allowed
  #9  
Old 08-29-06, 11:22 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies. The floor is concrete. I plan to do it all in one direction if I can figure out where to start. I thought it would be easier not to have to maintain a straight line the distance of 40 plus ft. from the west wall through two openings on the left side and having to match up the planks all the way to the other side and back to the right side entrance. I assume that they should be continuous on either side of the T mold. That would have made the dining room stand alone and not have to be figured into all the other calculations. My directions just say to start at the longest wall but don't have less than 2" at a wall. I am finding out it ain't that easy and I am getting more respect for those who have "been there and done that."
As you probably guessed the adjoining room is the kitchen which is enclosed except for two openings (32" on west side and 84" east side). The 7' opens into a large living room which has a 4 ft. parallel opening at the back on the right side which I also have to worry about. I prefer not to put a "T" there but if I have to I assume it should be in the center of the casing. The opening enters into a hall that has several doors. It would be nice if I would not have to rip every board at every wall. Thus far I haven't figured out how to avoid the tiny piece somewhere. I know this is starting to get complicated but I would appreciate any suggestions (other than don't do it in the kitchen, although that might be the best) I will follow all man. instructions such as applying adhesive to joints and silicone at the cabinets. What about that heavy side/by/side ref.? l plan to put something under the small casters to try to help distribute the weight. Thank you.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: