Wood meets Sliding Glass Door


  #1  
Old 09-25-06, 04:34 PM
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Wood meets Sliding Glass Door

What on earth are you supposed to do at a sliding glass door. I've read sites that recommend using a reducer or t-molding, but what do you nail the trim to? The track is metal. Are you supposed to nail these pieces to the concrete subfloor? What am I missing? :-(

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b204/aya9877/fsecure/trim002.jpg
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 09-25-06 at 05:29 PM. Reason: Removed IMG tags for easier copying and pasting.
  #2  
Old 09-26-06, 07:20 AM
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There should be a metal track for the reducer and/or t-moldings. You can either glue (like Gorilla glue) or screw the metal track piece to the concrete .

By your photo though, it looks as if there's not enough space. Make sure you have the proper space (gap) for any molding otherwise it will lock in. (Which means you'll have to pull up the wood again and cut it). Best to do it right though, otherwise when you'll run into the problem later and then you'll end up having to fix it later.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:05 AM
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oh I was afraid of that. sigh. Alright, well, I have researched the metal track and found that some people suggest gluing the trim directly to the concrete. Is the metal track a better way to go? It seems like it would make it easier down the road if we ever wanted to change the floors..
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:06 AM
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Also, is removing the boards to recut going to require pulling up the entire room? Or is there a trick to just pulling up the perimeter boards?
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:45 AM
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Wait...I didn't mean to use a metal track only. With the transition pieces there are metal track pieces that come with it. So, you attach the metal track piece to the floor with glue (Gorilla glue) or with the screws that come with it.. THEN the transition piece snaps right on top.

See if you can see this as an example:

http://floorone.com/product.asp?pn=UF436&name=Natural%20Varnished%20Maple

page down and you can see the trims and molding. You can see there's a metal piece underneath them. That's what I was talking about. Sorry if I said it wrong.

If it were me, I would pull up all the boards up to the door. I dunno if there would be another way. You may want to check back as others may have a suggestion or better resolution.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 12:08 PM
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No, I understood what you said about the metal track. I was saying that I have read that some installers just glue the molding to the concrete subfloor using an adhesive like liquid nails and don't bother using the metal track at all. The trim I ordered didn't come with a metal track, so I guess that's why I was confused when I was laying the flooring down initially. Had I know about the track, I would have left a bigger gap between the slider track and the wood. Unfortunately I just didn't think far enough ahead when I was installing the floors.

Thanks for all your advice!
 
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Old 09-26-06, 12:31 PM
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Hey DIYmewbie ....instead of messing with a t-molding or reducer, why don't you just grout along the gap?? As long as the hardwood cuts all line up pretty well, it would probably look better and that way, you won't have to rip any planks out or try and figure out how to attach the molding. I had bamboo flooring installed in my living and dining room ...this flooring butts up to my entry way slate tile that has a sweeping effect to it. A t-molding where the wood and slate meet would have looked goofy due to the sweeping effect of the slate so we used grout to fill in the gap between the wood and slate. It was the same grout we used for the slate. It looks wonderful and has never had a problem with the wood expanding/contracting in that spot. We made sure to leave the 1/4 to 1/2 inch gap along the walls for expansion. My bamboo was glued to our concrete slab with Bostkis Best. Hope this helps in your decision. Also, if you don't want to do this, you might go to a hardwood floorining retailer and ask the sales guys (and I don't mean Home Depot or Lowes ...they often times don't know the best way).

Let us know what you end up doing.

Steve
 
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Old 09-26-06, 02:54 PM
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grout is an excellent idea! I just don't understand how that allows for expansion. Are you saying to fill in the gap we left for expansion with grout?
 
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Old 09-26-06, 03:19 PM
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you must...MUST....leave an expansion gap all around the perimeter of your floating laminate wood floor.

is this laminate???
 
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Old 09-26-06, 05:28 PM
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No, it's not laminate. It's a tongue and groove from Kahrs, their Linnea line.
 
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Old 09-27-06, 11:41 AM
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grouting right up next to wood just doesn't sound quite right to me. i'd hold off on that until you confirm with a flooring professional about it. no offense fsufan8, but it's possible you've just gotten lucky not having encountered any problems yet.
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:20 PM
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DIYnewbie ...check with a wood floor installer or a wood floor retailer sales rep. Show him/her your photo and explain the grouting idea. I have a feeling they will tell you it's OK as long as you have left expansion space around the walls. I had my bamboo installed by a local, licensed professional and the installer thought the grouting between my slate and hardwood was a great idea. It's been over 2 years since it was installed and to this day, it still looks absolutely perfect. I've got a photo of it but not sure where to post it so you can see. Maybe photobucket? I would not have suggested this to you if I knew it would not be a good idea.

Steve
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:29 PM
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Thanks for all the replies.

FSUFan, I just want to make sure I understand you correctly. You filled in your expansion gap with grout? So how does that allow for expansion?
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:32 PM
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An end cap transition molding. E-mail me and I'll send you a picture.
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:47 PM
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The room I had bamboo installed in is rectangular in shape. The installer left expansion gaps around the 3 walls (1/2 inch). Along the 4th wall is my entry way slate tile. That tile extends out away from the front door 10 or so feet in a sweeping motion so that it rounds away from the right side wall. The bamboo is installed next to this slate tile. So yes, the gap between where the tiles end and where the bamboo starts is where he grouted with the same grout I used in the slate (heather grey color). I had 6" wide/6 foot long, hand-scraped Jacobean (dark) bamboo installed ...the wood can expand (if need be) towards the other 3 walls and the planks themselves are not super tight against each other ...there is a 1/2 millimeter gap in-between each plank, as well. The planks were glued down to the concrete slab foundation w/ Bostiks Best adhesive. But it looks wonderful.

I live in San Diego where the humidity is low and rain is scarce. The installed didn't even need to do a moisture test on the slab. All I'm saying is that it's an option for you to look into and it would look cleaner and be easier than a molding piece. But you should confirm with a licnesed, local wood installer for your application. Good luck and let us know what you end up going with.

Steve
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by fsufan8
The room I had bamboo installed in is rectangular in shape. The planks were glued down to the concrete slab foundation w/ Bostiks Best adhesive. But it looks wonderful.

I live in San Diego where the humidity is low and rain is scarce. The installed didn't even need to do a moisture test on the slab.
Steve


Yes you had a real professional there. I bet he goes to Vegas often.



The only thing I'll use colormatching sanded grout up next to a fixed object like tile(which needs an expansion gap also) or raised hearths, is when using an engineered wood for flooring, never a solid or bamboo.
 
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Old 09-27-06, 12:59 PM
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I used a local, highly reputable hardwood installer ...they are licensed and bonded and they weren't cheap. They did an awesome job ...there have been absolutely no problems. I talked to others here that have had hardwood installed and depending on where you live in the county, they sometimes by-pass the moisture test. My neighbors also used this same installer and no problems. I think he knows what he's doing.
 
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Old 09-27-06, 03:19 PM
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here's the photo of my floor ...this is what I've been referring to:

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01016.jpg

Steve
 
 

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