no-sand floor refinishing?


  #1  
Old 10-07-06, 07:06 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: US
Posts: 97
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
no-sand floor refinishing?

I have old pine floors with old poly finish -- they are not smooth, but it is a very old house and so perfectly smooth floors would not seem right. Also, they have been sanded before and I don't know how much wood is left before the tongue.

I have heard about a no-sand refinishing system (cleaning then a bonding agent then finish) and want to know if anyone has had experience with it. If so, would they recommend it? have any suggestions?
 
  #2  
Old 10-09-06, 01:45 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,047
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
There are no sanding products available. These are strippers. Complete removal of the old finish is important for a successful outcome. Read and follow label directions. Check for associated odor problems and flammability. It's that time of year where windows can not be opened if you live in an area where whether is getting cold. Most strippers require lots of ventilation and no sparks due to flammability.
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-06, 04:54 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: US
Posts: 97
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
No - it was RX for wood that I was referring to:

http://www.baneclene.com/catalog/rx-wood-step1.html

Also saw something that looked similar on Rustoleum site:

http://rustoleum.com/search.asp?Mode=N&SBL=1


Would appreciate anyone's input about these.
 
  #4  
Old 10-11-06, 06:08 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,730
Received 854 Upvotes on 748 Posts
I didn't take time to search the rustoleum site.

If you look again at the baneclene site it does say to sand. While a pad may not be the same as traditional sandpaper it does the same thing.

Wood floors don't always need to be completly stripped to spruce up the finish. If you don't sand into the stain and any/all wax or cleaners are removed you can apply a fresh coat of poly. For the new poly to bond to the old the wood needs to be sanded lightly. This can also be acomplished with deglossers like liquid sandpaper. This stuff has a very strong odor and for any area of size, sanding would be the preferred way to go!
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-06, 03:59 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 184
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Try the Bona Kemi website. I believe they have a line of refresher products.

Jan
 
  #6  
Old 10-17-06, 09:09 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 94
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
i've successfully used a chemical stripper (i believe it was called citrustrip) to get rid of all the finish ... in my case, it was an oak strip floor that had carpet glue on top of the finish ... the stripper did a great job of getting rid of everything! i followed it with multiple sandings (i wanted a really nice, smooth floor), but you could limit the number of sanding steps you do (ie: start with a finer grain sand paper than usual) to take off less material ... i would still recommend at least some sanding, but whether or not it's really required, i don't know

invest in a good gas mask rated for solvents ... it'll save your lungs and keep you from having to smell that stuff while you work!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: