IKEA laminate flooring


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Old 10-11-06, 07:44 AM
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IKEA laminate flooring

Anyone have any experience with these, for durability, fit and finish look. I'm not too worried about the ease of installation. I was looking at the span and tundra flooring, cost is a key factor for me. The Span is .68/sqft and the tundra is 1.29/sqft. Thanks

Jeff
 
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Old 10-11-06, 10:57 AM
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68 a square foot?

 
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Old 10-11-06, 11:44 AM
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Here's the proof

http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?topcategoryId=15582&catalogId=10103&storeId=12&productId=47543&langId=-1&categoryId=16054&chosenPartNumber=70082182
 
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Old 10-11-06, 11:52 AM
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I don't think it's b/c she doesn't believe you.

You can see previous threads about this laminate:

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=241337&highlight=ikea+laminate+flooring

There's a few more but use the search engine and type "Ikea laminate flooring"-that should work.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 11:53 AM
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You state that cost is a "key factor." "Durability and fit" are key factors, too. IKEA Tundra is "Fiberboard, Laminate (melamine foil)." Durability will depend upon how much traffic is in the household and if there will be moisture issues, as well as proper care and maintenance. Fit will be determined by the quality of the product in regard to squareness and the installer and installation system.

Most shop around and compare apples to apples re: quality of construction, installation method, warranty, ease of resolution if there is a warranty issue, etc. It is usually recommended to go with a major manufacturer who offers good, better, best levels of quality, warranty, and price. Most tend to feel that there is better value to go with the 'better' level of quality if the 'best' level is out of the budget range.

Better laminates offer a 10-25 year warranty against staining, wearing, and fading. Check your warranty. No warranty covers scratches. Usually the better the warranty, the better the product from the standpoints of construction and surface quality. Low end products tend not to live up to expectations and may not be the best bang for the buck despite low cost. Compare thickness of plank and thickness of wear layer with other products. Compare moisture warranties. Remember that 'moisture resistant' does not mean moisture proof. Compare locking systems on floating floors. Find out how you go about resolving a warranty claim.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 11:54 AM
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i wasn't doubting you.

if price is your #1 concern, go for it. just remember that you get what you pay for. and that's got to be THE absolutely cheapest laminate i've ever heard of. do you see where i'm going with this???

<---- that's a warning signal going off!!!!!
 
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Old 10-11-06, 12:07 PM
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Yeah I see where you're going.

I did do searches on the board and found most of the posts were pretty old I just had wondered if anyone had had personal experience with these laminates, and I also realize that everyone's experience can be different.

Yes all of those things are a factor so I probablly won't be going with the cheapest one there. This would be a family room and kitchen so it would get a fair ammount of traffic.

The tundra seems to be priced well for me and the style is what I'm going for also. So I might chose that, it says it's fade resistant also.

It's true I may have to just wait till I can afford to go with something a little higher quality possibly even hard wood, but my wife is sick of our cats staining my wall to wall carpet it's starting to look really bad and It's only 6 years old.

Jeff
 
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Old 10-11-06, 12:10 PM
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as long as you've got cats (plural) peeing in your house, on your floors, might as well go with the 68¢ stuff. seriously. you have my blessing!

you might even want to consider sheet vinyl that has a "wood" pattern. then the pee won't seep down into all the seams where it'll get trapped & REALLY smell.

if & when you are without the cats, THEN spring for the nice hardwoods.

i would encourage you to post in the Pets topic to see what you can do about the cat problems.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 12:25 PM
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cross my fingers it's not peeing it's vomitting mostly. They aren't really sick, they just chose to vomit on the carpet rather then the vinyl kitchen floor where it wouldn't stain and it would be super simple to clean up. I figured if I had laminate and they vomitted it would be easy to clean up and not stain it orange.

Jeff
 
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Old 10-11-06, 12:41 PM
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oooooooh! fur balls....gotcha. been there/done that. yep, they go for the carpet instead of the hard floor every time, don't they? darn cats...... (i actually tried switching our cat [RIP] to a taupe-colored cat food, just so it would at least MATCH our carpet when he hacked on it.......turns out, that food just made him urp more often & it still showed, although not as bad as the orange-colored food.....)

anyway............well, yes, that might be manageable then. just know that ANY liquid must be wiped up immediately or it will get into the seams & swell the planks & cause them to gap, buckle and/or delaminate.

good luck.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 01:07 PM
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define immediately? an hour? 12-24?
 
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Old 10-11-06, 01:15 PM
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8? as soon as possible. if you're putting dishes in the dishwasher & water splashes on the floor, wipe it up right away. do your best with the barf that's waiting for you when you get home from work & hope it hasn't been there long.

you'll be fine.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 03:07 PM
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Use enzyme digester cleaner on pet messes. The enzymes digest the organic stains and odors. The trick to using enzyme cleaners is to give the enzymes time to digest.

You can't, however, clean the carpet cushion beneath. Thus, the importance to attend to carpet spills immediately before it settles in. Furballs can be minimized with daily brushing.

Until carpet replacement is possible, have it professionally cleaned with enzyme treatment for pet messes.
 
 

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