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need a straight answer - radiant heat, laminate floor, what underlayment?????

need a straight answer - radiant heat, laminate floor, what underlayment?????


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Old 10-17-06, 06:22 PM
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Question need a straight answer - radiant heat, laminate floor, what underlayment?????

I have been doing a lot of research, and have found that no two sources have given me the same answer. I have radiant heat beneath the plywood subfloor, want to use laminate flooring (which everyone says is great for radiant floors), and need to know what underlayment to use. Armstrong (flooring I think I'll be using) recommends 2 of their own products both with moisture barrier, while other places say use cork, yet another says don't use cork EVER over radiant. Does anyone have actual experience with this situation? I see others have posted, but the usual answer is "ask the manufacturer" and that didn't really get me too far. They basically just say to keep the floor temp below 85 degrees, but doesn't require much else. Any help would be greatly appreciated

greg
 
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Old 10-17-06, 06:23 PM
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fogot to mention another place says rubber underlayment is the way to go, while yet ANOTHER says some sound barrier 6 is the way to go.
 
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Old 10-18-06, 05:09 AM
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got some info from the radaint company, and they said since the radiant systems water temp isn't as high as older systems used to run (125 vs 185 degrees), there is no real worry using the laminate over it. It doesn't sound like I need any type of vapor barrier either, as it is not on a slab. Just a matter of finding a good underlayment with a relatively low r-value that can be used over heated floors
 
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Old 10-18-06, 05:51 AM
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1stchair, welcome to the DIY forums

No pro, but the reason why you'll find a lot in these forums about laminate wood, "ask the manufacturer" or rather, follow the manufacturer's instructions is b/c if you don't, it will void the warranty. If you are going with Armstrong...go w/what Armstrong recommends.

Everyone has different situations and that may be why you are reading different recommendations.

Just my thoughts...
 
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Old 10-18-06, 03:53 PM
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thanks for the reply. I understand the reasoning behind asking the manufacturer, as I don't want to void the warranty, but they don't really address the radiant issue directly, besides telling me to keep the temp of the floor below 85 degrees.

Does anyone know if there is a comparable underlayment to the armstrong S-1833 which is a thin layer of foam topped with a plastic moisture barrier and the second is called Two-in-One Premium underlayment, # S-1832 and has a layer of felt padding topped with a plastic moisture barrier.

I don't have a problem, necessarily with going with either of these, as an armstrong rep told me, but do I have to use these specific ones from armstrong? Does anyone make something like these at a better price or a better underlayment for a comparable price?

Of course armstrong will recommend their own materials, why wouldn't they. Does it void my warranty if I use the same type of underlayment, but from another manufacturer
 
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Old 10-18-06, 05:17 PM
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Having had experience with radiant floors in a child care building, anything above 85deg feels hot, and uncomfortable.. I always "tried" to keep them below 80deg.. If the floors are too warm, you'll want to turn the AC on..
I say "tried" because when the floors were poured, the workers didn't know, or care where to put the temp sensors, and some were below the concrete, others were next to the heating coils, some were ok, etc.. That was a nightmare.. I had to cut grooves in the concrete to lay 20 foot averaging sensors in the floors, so I could disconnect the installed sensors, and get a reasonable temp reading..
 
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Old 10-19-06, 04:57 AM
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yeah, I don't see my floors ever getting that hot, so I am thinking the radiant won't be much of a factor. the floor will be floating, too, so that will allow for expansion due to heat or moisture
 
 

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