concrete floor leveling

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Old 11-11-06, 10:51 AM
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concrete floor leveling

We are about to install a wood engineered floor over a concrete slab, with the use of an adhesive. Our concrete floor is not level. In the middle section of a 14/18 room, the floor dips to approximately 1 to 1 1/2 inches below the outside walls. There are a myriad of self-leveling products. I was wondering if anyone who has self-leveled a concrete floor could give us some advice as to the product best suited for our purpose.
 
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Old 11-11-06, 02:20 PM
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I'm in the process of basically doing the same thing. I was told to grind down any high spots (extremely dusty) and fill in any low spots by screeding a product like Mapei's PlaniPatch over the depression.
SLC's(self leveling compounds) will also do the job but they can be very tricky and since I've never used one before, I was warned against them.
 
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Old 11-11-06, 07:07 PM
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Self leveling compounds are not all that tough if you know how to use them. I've used a product called level quick and, after a little trial and error, found that it actually worked well. It seems to like being mixed sort of soupy, at least that's what I found worked the best. The term "self leveling" is some what deceptive though. I thought it meant dump it out and run so you don't get it on your feet so that's what I did the first time. Bad plan. Self leveling does not mean self spreading. It has to be screeded into place where you want it and then it will self level the surface smooth on it's own. This, of course largely depends on the size of the area you need to level. Are you, as it sounds, saying the whole floor sags like that? If so, the self leveling compounds will work, but what a chore and Lord knows how many bags. I've had to deal with only one floor before that was that far out in that large an area and the contractor opted to have a poured floor company come in and level it for him with gypcreet or something like that. If you've got that much to level, you might want to explore an option like that.
 
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Old 01-27-08, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by dkpbxman View Post
I'm in the process of basically doing the same thing. I was told to grind down any high spots (extremely dusty) and fill in any low spots by screeding a product like Mapei's PlaniPatch over the depression.
SLC's(self leveling compounds) will also do the job but they can be very tricky and since I've never used one before, I was warned against them.
I think that grinding is a great way if the area is large enough. BUT do it wet, NOT dry. For many reasons besides the dust. Check with the tool rental guy to get the right pads or discs for wet grinding. It's messy but the slurry helps to fill in small cracks too and if you do it right you will have a floor ready to be acid-etched if you want. And besides beautiful hardwood, there is no better looking floor than a well done acid-etched finish - and it will last a hundred years.
 
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Old 01-27-08, 06:51 PM
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Old thread......
 
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