Where to start with multiple rooms/openings

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  #1  
Old 11-14-06, 12:06 PM
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Where to start with multiple rooms/openings

OK.....1st timer doing 3/4 pre-finished hardwood in my upstairs of a 18 year old colonial. I will be doing the 2 front bedrooms of the house, then the center hallway that meets up to hardwood stairs, then the rear master bedroom. My question is "Where do I start if I want all the bedroom doorways to match nicely with the hallway"? I do not want transistions at the doors. I know squareness in rooms is a key but the starting point and how to get all the door openings to look nice sounds tricky. Any insight appreciated!
 
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  #2  
Old 11-14-06, 04:01 PM
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Using a transition piece defines each space as separate, and allows each space to expand and contract by it self. But you can also connect everythig together in one pig piece. Just make sure you leave gaps at the walls and leave the open boxes of flooring in the rooms where they will be installed, for 3-6 wks to acclimate.
 
  #3  
Old 11-14-06, 06:09 PM
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All that having been said, start in the hallway. If all the rooms come off it, once the hall is done and the material is in or through the doorways, each room can then be done off that doorway. Just Bill is correct, you really should use transitions in the doorways for the reasons sited, but I'm with you. I don't use them because I don't like the look of them, even though I know I should. And you can't have too many people stress the expansion gap. Follow the instructions in that regard or it won't be good.
 
  #4  
Old 11-15-06, 05:20 AM
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To Transition or not to tranisition...

On a similar note, I have back to back living room/dining room, with an 8 foot opening between them. I am doing laminate throughout, which includes a hallway. Should I do a transition strip between living room and dining room? Well I guess the answer is that I should...but do I really have to?
 
  #5  
Old 11-15-06, 06:39 AM
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I did a restaurant once in laminate that was 2300 sq. ft. It consisted of two large rooms joined together in an open entry area that I tiled. The walkway between the two areas was four feet wide and that was where the laminate joined from the two rooms. There have been two other restaurant owners in there since, the material is holding up well, and there have been no problems where the two join. That job was done a few years ago.
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-06, 07:15 AM
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Unhappy Transition piece????

Smokey or Bill..........help me understand what a "transition" piece looks like? My understanding is that it is like a "T" shaped low "speed bump" style piece you put in between the 2 adjoing floors where you can leave a gap under it....is that correct?
 
  #7  
Old 11-15-06, 09:05 AM
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Basically, yes, that's what they are. They have a track that fastens to the floor with screws or glue and the transition snaps into them. Some installers don't use the track and just glue the transition down which I don't like to do because of the potential need to remove it at some later date. There are several styles designed to answer different needs and some times one transition can be used in different ways to answer more than one issue. Any place that sells laminate should have an array of samples to choose from.
 
  #8  
Old 11-15-06, 11:05 AM
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Unhappy Acclamation in Winter

Since I live in New England and may be doing this hardwood floor project in December.........what should my acclamation time be for the wood? I have a hot water/baseboard system so no hot "air" so to speak. I do NOT have a central AC system, only window units for summer and basically my house/basement does not have any water problems. Someone said that since its winter I should probably install the floor somewhat "loose".... meaning don't "jam tight" each piece to piece so if there is any expansion in humid weather!!! Any advice on this area????
 
  #9  
Old 11-15-06, 12:20 PM
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Picklesnouts - I owe you an apology. You're talking 3/4 hardwood and I'm talking laminate; two different worlds. The transition described earlier is a laminate transition. Provided he didn't make the same mistake I did, my guess is Just Bill was referring more to a traditional transition in doorways with full hard wood. These transitions are normally not something different but actually a different way of running the grain in the wood and has the visual effect of breaking up the various areas to sort of define them. For instance, A very large area that has several functions going on such as a sitting area, a dining area, a hobby area, and so on in this same large area can be broken up some and each area defined by just running the grain different ways in the various areas and running it all the same way in what would then look like walkways around them. I've also seen decorative stone or tile used to accomplish transitions from room to room. I'm not so sure these are used for much more than visual effects, but I could be wrong, as you now well know. Sorry for the mistake.
 
  #10  
Old 11-16-06, 04:29 AM
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Transition or threshold, teminology seems to be the issue. For a hardwood floor, I am referring to a piece like a threshold, that connects one room to the next, but is not really connected to both. It allows some movement between rooms. One way to do that so it does not show as a seperate piece, is rotate the direction of the tonque at the doorway. Put two pieces groove to groove with a spline, then start the next room from that point. It will appear seamless, but they are not really connected.
Since you are already into your heating season, I would monitor the humidity, and maybe add some. The idea of not nailing things too tightly sounds good, but I am not sure how you do that, since the nailing process is designed to "jamb" things tightly together. The best I can offer is make sure the wood is acclimated to the rooms before starting.
 
  #11  
Old 11-16-06, 10:35 AM
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Red face Just Bill & Smokey.............

1st let me say you guys are the best........thanks for all the insight! Second thing Just Bill is the transistion "spline" you describe. The way I understand it is that when I get to the door way......don't tongue/groove the doorway piece into the next room but put rotate the board so the tongue now sticks into the room...from there you say "spline"??? I would figure that I would just face nail that piece and fill the nail holes......am I wrong?
 
  #12  
Old 11-16-06, 10:49 AM
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I've never installed hard wood so I'm bowing out of this one but will watch it with interest. What Just Bill is suggesting is a neat trick I wouldn't have thought of and I also am curious as to how to fasten that kind of joint. Have fun with your project.
 
  #13  
Old 11-16-06, 03:24 PM
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Basically, a spline is a tonque removed from a board, but it can be cut specially for your type of floor, since you are putting two grooves back to back. It simply holds the floor from too much verticle movement, but allows horizontal movement.
 
  #14  
Old 11-16-06, 08:11 PM
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Unless I completely misunderstand, the concept seems obvious. It looks like it's kinda like biscuits when joining wood panels, only not glued. The spline appears to be a piece of wood the same size as the tongue on the flooring, except that it's wide enough to engage both grooves that are butted up together. This would allow a seamless look and yet not actually tie the two areas together allowing them to move separately. Is that the idea? If so, how would they be fastened? The only thing I can see is to face nail them and fill the holes to hide them, or glue the pieces down. I know I said I was bowing out, but I lied. I can't stand it.
 
  #15  
Old 11-17-06, 03:56 AM
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Each piece is nailed at its' tonque as normal, so the boards won't go anywhere.
 
  #16  
Old 11-17-06, 07:29 AM
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In that case, do you nail through the spline? It seems to me that would defeat the purpose of the spline. I would think this type of joint would have to have one side or the other fastened down or the joint would tend to rise or buckle where the spline is, and yet it would need to be done in such a way as to allow the spline to float in the joint or what would be the point? I suppose the board on one side could be hand nailed and nail set first into the bottom of the groove, the spline then inserted, and the install then continued as normal. I'm leaving to go out of town for the weekend so I won't be able to look at this again until Monday. Keep up the good work, I'm goin' to a car show.
 
  #17  
Old 11-17-06, 10:37 AM
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Smile Car Show---Smokey what do ya have?

Reason I ask is that I am a car nut/gear head and just got done doing a 66 GTO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Nothing against house work but there's nothing like rowing the old "handshaker" through the gears.
 
  #18  
Old 11-17-06, 04:09 PM
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Now we're talking.............cars. I have a 57 Chevy, 327, +.060, 350HP cam, 4spd. Working on a 36 plymouth woody, with baby hemi(57 D500)700R4. But we are changing the subject, verbotten.
 
  #19  
Old 11-18-06, 11:30 AM
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If the wood is running with the stair nose and not butting into it, I will start the installation right there. If butting into the nose, I would start in the hall as suggested, and spline and work backwards where needed.


Udercut the doorjambs, so the flooring slides underneath, for a clean professional look.
 
  #20  
Old 11-18-06, 04:04 PM
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Oh..............stairs with a new floor is a completely different issue. You can't just add 3/4" to the floor at the top step. That creates a major tripping hazard.
 
  #21  
Old 11-20-06, 08:50 AM
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That's what the stair nose addresses. The stair nose terminates the wood and eliminates the trip hazard. I still don't see an answer to the "fastening down the spline joint" question so I guess I'll do some research. The car show turned out to actually be an antique car parts swap meet with lots of rusty parts but not a single '57 chevy two door hard top with a 427 rat to be found. Oh well, it was still fun.
 
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