DuPont Real Touch Elite?

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Old 11-19-06, 07:03 AM
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DuPont Real Touch Elite?

Hi, two quick questions. I see alot of people asking various questions about the dupont laminates, but no one who has used them says whether they like them or how they hold up.

Also, they have the foam backing already applied, so is additional foam unneed to prevent sound? in an old townhouse we used to have, it had cheap laminates in 2 rooms, and although they looked nice, they sounded very hollow to walk on. if we put additional sound guard foam under the duponts, would that be better or too much?


thanks
 
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Old 11-19-06, 08:03 AM
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DON"T USE A SEPARATE CUSHION!!

If it has attacted cushion, all you need is a separat moisture barrier, only if your going over concrete.

Use transition "T" moldings at all doorways less then 5 feet wide, or you'll regret it.
 
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Old 11-19-06, 08:51 AM
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OK, souds good. is the extra cushion overkill, is will it cause the planks not to lie correctly?
with regard to the Ts, why on doors less than 5 feet wide? what do they do?
also, if I am laying it in adjoining living room and dining room, and the opening between the rooms is 9 feet, I don't need to use a T joint there, right? just continue to lay the planks?
thanks again for everyone's help
 
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Old 11-19-06, 04:45 PM
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As the two separtae areas move they like to move independently. Anything less the 5 feet and there is not enough strength in the joints to hold it together through a narrower doorway. It will eventually separate at the doorway.

9 feet is plenty, run it through, you have stength running through there with that much jointery holding things together.
 
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Old 11-19-06, 06:48 PM
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ok great thanks for the help.
One last question, when do you have to undercut the walls when installing laminate? only under the door jams? the instructions (dupont real touch elite) don't mention it anywhere, they just say to use spacers when installing.
Also, speaking of spacers, do you put them down far enough so that the tounge and groves are kept 1/4 inch away from walls, or the top of the planks?

sorry for the dumb quesitons, I appreciate everyones help
 
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Old 11-21-06, 09:29 PM
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They are not dumb questions, as the instructions that come with that product are just enough to hang yourself with.

They don't mention anything about substrate flatness requirements either, which is very, very important with floating laminate flooring.

When to under cut them... Right after all the floor prep to flatten the substrate.

Oh, that when... LOL!

Undercut all the way around doorjambs that have casing to the substrate, if it is just a walk through with wallbase triming just the bottom, you don't under cut that, it gets round trim.

If your leaving baseboards on while installing, and trimming with round, cut past the doorjamb trim, into the baseboard about an inch and chisel it out. That way you won't have a hole or locked in floor, by running the flooring under the baseboard a little on the side. You'll see what I mean when you get there.

Cut the existing tongue off along the starting walls.
 
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Old 11-22-06, 10:18 AM
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You don't want to put any additional foam pad under the floor. It causes the joints to flex too much. I've seen them actually disintegrate, turning the part of the joint that locks together into a powder that looks like termites have been after it. The somewhat hollow sound you mentioned is one of the drawbacks to floating floors. A little trick I use to avoid the need for 1/4 round after base is to under cut the sheet rock on all the walls enough to allow the laminate to slide under it. I clean the void left of any debris and then install the laminate even with the outer edge of the wall. Most walls have 1/2 inch sheet rock so this gives the laminate a full half inch to swell before contacting the framing plate. Most wall base is half to three quarter thick and, with the laminate even with the outer edge of the sheet rock, the base allows it the full thickness of said base to shrink before coming out from under it. That's at least a full inch of movement which is more than required.
 
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Old 11-22-06, 10:18 AM
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yeah you are exactly right, the directions are just vague enough to drive you completely crazy trying to figure them out. It almost seems like they took directions which were twenty steps long, and randomly removed eight of the steps from the directions, and you are left to somehow figure them out.

Thanks again for the help ;-)
 
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Old 11-22-06, 10:59 AM
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any recomendations on the type / brand of table saw blade to use to cut laminates?
 
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Old 11-22-06, 04:09 PM
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Pretty much anything with a spinning blade.

Blade choice is what is important. 60 tooth is recommended to resist chipping at the cut as the blade dulls.

Harbor Frieght Tools has a compact 10" table saw for less the $100(I've had one for 8 years and put it through the ringer) and they have $10 - 60 tooth blades that last longer then some of the $40 blades.

My big Craftsman table saw is overkill and bulky to pack from job to job. It is basically a shop saw, set up and working in the garage workroom.

Use a circular saw, and cut from the back. A jig saw over a bucket is all they use in Europe to install laminates.
 
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Old 11-26-06, 06:46 PM
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OK, I'm done installing them, just have to finish some of the shoe molding. For anyone else thinking of using the Dupont Real Touch Elite, I will share my thoughts:
I am very pleased with the way they turned out. They look sharp, feel "solid", and don't have the hollow click some cheaper laminates have when you walk on them. Installaion was relatively easy one you get the hang of the required angle / tilting motion to lock them in. I would recomend they improve the instructions with regard to this. They are more expensive than most of the laminates out there, but come with the backer foam built in, and seem to be more "solid" than some of the cheaper pergos and traffic master. They also look more like real wood than we expected, somewhat richer looking than the others.
Overall, so far we are very satisfied.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 10:37 AM
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Exclamation Chipping of material at corners....

My contractor installed some of this this past weekend and when I arrived to inpspect it.....I found several small triangele chips in the corners where he would lock in the short end of one piece to the short end of another piece. Has anyone els experienced this? And can it be repaired or covered up....OR should I have him "unlock" back to these peices and replace. Help?
 
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Old 01-26-09, 09:59 AM
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Baseboards

Do you have to take off the baseboards to install this? If not is there any specific changes in the instalation I need to know about?
 
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Old 01-27-09, 01:46 PM
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I found that the install was easier with the baseboards removed. I was replacing mine anyway. However, if you chose to leave the baseboard, you still have to leave the specified expansion gap around the room. After you get the floor done, then you install shoe moulding to cover up the gap.
 
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Old 02-14-09, 11:44 PM
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Vertical

I was really wondering if you can install this flooring vertically as well as on the floor I am installing it in a bathroom and was hoping to go up the wall around the toilet too but don't want it to peel off the underlayment in a couple years does anyone know anything about that
 
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