foam underlayment install for laminate floor


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Old 11-24-06, 05:38 AM
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foam underlayment install for laminate floor

I'm ready to install foam underlayment that has plastic vapor barrier attached. The instructions say to have it go up the wall 2 inches because I'm installing over concrete slab.
I was not going to remove my baseboards, just leave the expansion gap and cover it with 1/4 round molding.So do I just trim off the excess underlayment or do I have to remove my baseboards and put the underlayment behind them?
And if I put it behind the baseboards there will be a gap where the baseboard meets the wall.My Shaw directions are not very clear about this.
Thanks-
 
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Old 11-24-06, 06:27 AM
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I always remove and reinstall the base, regardless of floor construction. I've seen laminate floors shrink out from under with just 1/4 round so I like to give it lots of room to move. Is your base paint or stain grade? If it's painted, you'll want to caulk the top, fill the nail holes, and touch up paint so a small gap shouldn't matter.
 
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Old 11-24-06, 07:12 AM
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My baseboards are paint grade and my new walls in our new house are not straight!
I removed my baseboards in our entryway when I put ceramic tile down. All I did was remove them and when I put them back on nothing lined up right, the miters did not match back up and the baseboard was straight but the wall wasn't. I'm still trying to fix that-
 
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Old 11-24-06, 08:25 AM
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They want the foam and moisture barrier to go up the walls a bit to form a bit of a bowl to keep out moisture. Concrete is surprisingly porous and wicks ground water so it can be more of an issue than wood floors. In the final analysis, it's your home and you can do as you please, but your warranty will most likely be void if you don't follow the instructions. I will admit, in my own home, I normally don't get too hung up on warranty because I'm the one who has to do it over if it fails and they're not going to pay a DIY for installation anyhow. I heard a carpenter say once, "paint and caulk makes a carpenter what he's not." The issues with the base can be made to look pretty good in even situations such as you describe.
 
 

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