leveling floor?

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Old 11-26-06, 03:16 PM
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Question leveling floor?

Hi,
I need to replace the flooring in a bedroom. It's an older addition to the house without a basement below it. The floor is sloped to the outside wall and uneven in other areas. I would guess it slopes probably 1-2" total from one side of the room to the other. it had a false floor over it but was very wavy and creaky...I've since removed that...I need to level it and I have been getting conflicting opinions from people.

what is the best way?

should I use a leveling compound (I have no experience using it) or should I shim before putting the new plywood down? Any other ideas or tips would be great! I haven't actually finalized using laminate or carpet...but I would like a level floor either way.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 06:21 AM
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Questions, questions

1st, what is the floor made of? what is the build-up like?
2nd, What is the support structure like? (2x10's, 16" o.c., etc.)
3rd, how out of level is the support structure? (sometimes, it is only the subfloor that is out of level and the joists are still good)
4th, look around the room and get a visual of how the room/house has settled over time. If you jack the floor, how much damage will you creat in other places?
 
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Old 11-29-06, 10:09 PM
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thanks for the reply. I do not have access below the addition for this room so I'm not sure what kind of support structure there is. I'm down to the original floor at this time which is plywood over what looks like 1x4's? maybe...set out like slats if that makes any sense to you...

It looks like the addition has just settled like this and I am not that interested in gaining access under it to jack it up...it's winter and that sounds like no fun! Hope that answers your questions... thanks
 
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Old 11-30-06, 07:17 AM
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My grandfather would be under the house, jacking on something, every spring. and sometimes in the fall.

Get a handle on the settling, or it could cause major damage in the future. That's how homes get run down and basically start falling apart.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 04:48 PM
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The house is 100years old and has had multiple additions that have settled over time...the house is just under 1000sqfeet and I believe it is not a smart financial move to be dumping an excessive amount of money to level the entire house. This is my first house and I have been here for about a year and a half and will not be here longer than a couple more years. I did have a home inspection done and the inspection said that it looks like then house is finished settling...
 
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Old 12-01-06, 04:04 AM
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I hate to suggest this, but it sounds to like more than just settling, it sounds like poor construction or worse. I would have it investigated but an expert, not a home inspector. If you have ever watched 'This Old House' you will understand the possibilities. You may not be there long, but you will want to sell the house someday, and structural problems don't sell well.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 06:10 AM
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Some food for thought

Years ago I had a house in Central PA. THe house was a split level, with the kitchen about 2' below grade. The previous owners put an addition on from the kitchen out about 11 feet. Still 2' below grade. They used it as a sun porch. I came along and converted it into living space with heat, new drywall, insulatation, tile floor wood stove, etc. They had left the original ceder clapboard siding on the house in the kitchen area. I was thinking of leaving it, but it just did not work with the newly remodeled area. So, I pulled it off. For a 20' section of original exterior wall (now interior), the studs were gone from the fdn wall up 2'. It was a combination of rot and destruction from the infamous southern pine post beatle (there were tons of dead bodies in that wall). I did not see the damage from the outside, nor did the house suggest it was there. Who knows how long the house would have kept that secret before giving it up with horrible results.

Sorry for the ramble, but you should really try and figure out where the probem is. There is nothing worse than dumping money into something, only to have it wrecked later.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 07:39 AM
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I expect poor construction to be part of it...the person who did much of the prev. work before me seemed to half-ass everything! Every time I pull something apart it's something new...the funny thing is both the neighbors have been running into the same problem with their houses...
 
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Old 06-15-07, 04:31 PM
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Leveling a concrete entry

Hi,

This thread somewhat relates to the problem I'm facing now. The old house I just bought has an entry hall 6.5' wide by 21' long and is sloping along the width by 2.5"-3". It appears that this area used to be outside and is done like so for water run-off from the original entry door, so now it is an indoor floor. I ripped out the ceramic tiles and now have bare concrete with tile thinset here and there along with a few crevaces due to the jack hammer I used. I've had multiple answers from different people from the big-box stores so I'm not sure how to proceed. One mentioned using regular concrete mix and another mentioned using a mud bed with a lathe in the center. The challenge is to use the best mix that would last for 0.5" thick on one side to 3" thick on the other (along the width of the area). My final goal is to either
1) stain the floor if it comes out really smooth (depending on the material and job quality)
2) install laminate floor on top.

Your suggestions and advice are much appreciated.
 
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