Installing a transitional piece over laminate


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Old 11-27-06, 12:18 PM
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Installing a transitional piece over laminate

I have just finished installing a laminate floor in my living room. I need to buy a reducing strip to fit 12 linear feet since that is the opening from it to a slightly elevated (perhaps 1/4") dining room floor. I will be buying oak or other hardwood for the strip since I don't like that ones sold for laminates even if I could get the right size. My question is, how to best install the hardwood strip oak over the laminate as my subfloor is Oriented Strand Board (OSB), something I had been calling "waferboard" and I am concerned that the screws, once through the hardwood trim, won't grab the subfloor under it. Would liquid nails work.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 02:22 PM
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My personal prejudice is in favor of PL400, but I'd think any good construction adhesive would work. Make sure the strip is done in such a way as to not impede the necessary movement in the flooring. I'd also screw it as an added measure.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 08:31 PM
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Glue it and use small brad nails to hold it so it doesn't move while the glue sets up.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 09:02 AM
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Thanks for the advice Smokey

Originally Posted by Smokey49
My personal prejudice is in favor of PL400, but I'd think any good construction adhesive would work. Make sure the strip is done in such a way as to not impede the necessary movement in the flooring. I'd also screw it as an added measure.
Thanks for the advice. I have used PL 400 as well but I have another question. I know about the need to allow for expansion but in the past, to be honest, I have not exactly been a stickler for leaving a precise gap between the wall and the floor and over the years I have never noticed any problem whatsoever. How much can the floor really expand and under what conditions? Is it all temperature related?
 
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Old 12-01-06, 07:31 PM
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That is really a matter of where you live. Different areas of the country experience different amounts of humidity and varying temperature swings and what causes problems in the mountains of Colorado may not be a real issue in Death Valley. Where I live, I've seen laminate shrink right out from under base board and even transition pieces so everyone adds 1/4 round after base for that reason. I've also seen laminate floors with this big bulge in the room because the floor was installed too tight to the wall, had no place to grow, so it bowed up. One potential reason you may not have had problems in the past was due to sheet rock. One of the tricks I use to help with it is to make sure the sheet rock has a sufficient gap at the floor to allow the laminate to swell under it. You may have had that and just not realized you were actually leaving a gap the thickness of the sheet rock. The manufacturers have to tailor the installation requirements to worst case scenarios in order to cover all the bases and it's best to follow the instructions if for no other reason than to have a leg to stand on if a warranty issue ever comes up. If it's worked for you in the past and you're not concerned about your warranty, it's your house, do as you please. Just do so with your eyes open. By the way, I think the brad nails are a better idea than screws. They won't leave as much of a hole and will be easier to hide.
 
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Old 12-04-06, 07:03 AM
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The brads worked

I used the liquid adhesive and followed it up with the brads and some weight to help while the glue cured. As it was not a thick piece of oak I used small pilot holes so as not to split it and it came out great, beautifully trimmed I might add and ready for staining.

Thanks again.
 
 

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