Is this OK to do? (Transition carpet to hardwood)


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Old 11-28-06, 11:31 AM
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Is this OK to do? (Transition carpet to hardwood)

Thinking of removing existing ceramic tile and installing hardwood on a small (11' X 6.5') foyer. I really don't want to use a transition piece between hardwood and the carpet. Is it ok to simply tuck the carpet in the grove of the last board? The tack strip would hold the carpet taught but I don't know if I'm opening up a can of worm by doing it this way...

Thanks in advance for the assistance..

Frank
 
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Old 11-29-06, 12:18 PM
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Try it. I've done it in the past and it's worked. I normally chisel the bottom part of the groove off so the carpet stuffs better. If you have a thick or fuzzy yarn in the carpet, it tends to help hide the edge some. It also works to cut the whole groove off, slightly bevel the edge of the wood so you don't have a sharp edge to break or injure, and stuff to the wood.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 08:24 PM
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The admin, didn't like my link...


Do a google for Carpet Shims. actually typed as one word with a www in front of it. It makes for a nice transition to thicker flooring like wood and tile over CBU's.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 09:01 PM
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Learn something new every day! Carpet shims!! What a wonderful solution for making transition from carpet to tile or hardwood.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 09:31 PM
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I know they sound good on paper, but I don't like them. They build in a trampoline effect which is a future warranty issue on the part of the installer.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 11:24 PM
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Please explain trampoline effect.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 06:16 AM
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One of the things that causes carpet to loose it's stretch is a trampoline effect. For instance, carpet installed over an older wide plank floor that was not glued down. The planks tend to cup over time. If a straight edge is placed across them, you'll see that the edges of the planks are higher than the centers. When the carpet is stretched over this situation, it will span the cups in the planks and look good for a while. But each plank has a void under the carpet where the low spot in the center is and this low spot is the trampoline, named so after the tight surface of a trampoline with air under it for bouncing. Carpet in today's world is not flex friendly due to the construction of the backing and will delaminate if stretched or bent too much with traffic. Compare it to a piece of thin sheet metal or tin. Fold the metal in half and crease the fold. If you want to break it, bend or flex the fold dramatically and it will break readilly. But, if only lightly flexed, it will last a long time without breaking on the fold. Today's carpets don't like to flex due to the dual layered backing which is why manufacturers don't like pad any thicker than 1/2 or less dense than 6#. A trampoline effect is created any time the stretch in the carpet causes it to span a void that will be walked on and this is what I've seen caused by these shims. They bring the carpet level up to the edge of the thicker surface that they're trying to match, but they cause a trampoline out into the room as far as the tightness of the stretch and weight of the material used will allow. Over time, with traffic, the carpet will lay back down into the void, but the backing doesn't like it.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 06:43 AM
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Johnsonite also has a similar product. Both of which are recommended by Shaw, Beaulieu, and Mohawk, CFI and FIANA included.

The trampoline effect mentioned is so minimal the carpet is not compromised as the cushion is the support under foot traffic.

I can see the nylon properties in the backing material loose memory, but not delamination. If that were the case, the carpet would delaminate when installed and powerstretched.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 07:27 AM
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Any technical jargon you want to put on it, go ahead. The end result is the same and I've had to repair too many issues with useing it that show up after about a year. One of the stores in the area I just moved from has stopped useing them altogether for the same reason.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 05:38 AM
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When the client doesn't like what they see after installation, something has to be done about it. Wood or tiles sitting up proud of the carpet is undesirable around here. The carpet better be exacly even or slightly higher then the hard surface, or you will be back correcting it.


There are those situations where the wood sits really higher then the carpeted areas, such as solid wood, over plywood, over concrete.

These get ramped, but only using fillers to ramp, with a portland cement and way out into the carpeted room.

Cedar shingles have been and still are used to ramp to higher surfaces.

It sure beats stacking two pieces of tackstrip on top of each other to get the height needed at the transition. Which is done here all the time. Talk about a failure waiting to happen!!
 
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Old 12-01-06, 06:06 AM
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Absolutely. I've seen a lot of installers use that stacked tack strip thing and that's even worse. I did, however, double stack a whole room once. Back in the jute back days, nine sixteenths four pound pad was popular to get that cushy, walkin' on the beach feel, I had a customer who wanted it doubled up in the grand kids play room so they wouldn't bump their little heads when they fell, and there was no talking her out of it. Having nothing handy to raise the strip, I doubled it up. In the area I just left, there were several very skilled installers and non of us would ramp carpet without a signed waiver unless it was a glue down. I did do it with patch once. I ramped it about three feet out, let it dry good, and glued a piece of cheap vinyl to it to hold it together after it started breaking up. I do have to admit, I never got called back on it. I did, however get called back on a shimmed install. I couldn't talk the contractor out of it, he was a good friend, and when it failed he told me the repair would have been on me if I hadn't warned him.
 
 

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