High moisture concrete slab


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Old 01-15-07, 05:50 PM
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High moisture concrete slab

My new wood flooring (3/8" Bellawood) glued to the concrete slab in my new house is showing signs of excess moisture (separation and raised edges). It's been down almost two months. An inspector took a moisture reading of the slab thru the wood and says the slab shows a moisture content of 26 - 30%. That sounds really high to me. Is there something wrong with the concrete to have that high a moisture and can any wood be sucessfully glued down even with a moisture barrier. Any help is appreciated. Bob
 
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Old 01-15-07, 08:58 PM
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When you get tired of the cupped wood, remove it and the adhesive.

Do a moisture test on the concrete, to determine just how much your dealing with.

www.floorprep.com

Look for cut down & vaporseal


Who advised you to put down a solid wood, on concrete??? That's where your problem lies!!!! That guy gave you just enough info to hang yourself, so your there buying more wood!!!

Get an engineered wood this time, because as you have found out the hard way, a solid over concrete is a BIG risk.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 07:31 AM
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thanks Perry. Bellawood says their 3/8" solid is ok to put down on concrete. see their web site. we are going with an engineered wood as a replacement (haven't picked it out yet). I'm concerned if the moisture is really 25% after the slab has been down 8 months, can any sealant work and keep the new floor from doing the same thing. Your thoughts. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 07:52 AM
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Floorman67 may have the info you need of Perry does not,he is a walking flooring encyclodiepia.

They do offer moisture repellants but your moisture readings are excessive,I would look for the reason for the moisture first.

Did you install the wood or have done proffessionally.?
 
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Old 01-16-07, 09:06 AM
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The builder had it done by "his" guy. He did not use a moisture sealer on the concrete, he thought the glue (Bostik Best) was going to take care of any moisture. He didn't take a moisture reading either. Just a bad install overall in my opinion. The floor has about 30% of it showing hollow areas right now. The cupping, although not severe, is something that has shown up in the last 2 or 3 weeks. I'm afraid it will continue to deteriorate over time. My builder as of yesterday said he would replace the floor, but my biggest worry is the high moisture. I am also a little leary that an analyzer (Tramax) placed on the wood floor can accurately measure the moisture in the concrete. The slab is sufficiently above grade so that moisture is not coming in from runoff (I think). I was told they used a moisture barrier (poly) when they poured the slab, but I didn't witness that. I was also told that it rained while they were finishing the concrete and they had to work it over more than normal. Maybe that accounts for the pot holed surface on the slab while they were building the house. Any other info is appreciated.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:45 AM
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Check your extierior drainage.
I have seen this affect slabs and cause this kind of moisture.
You have to get to the bottom of the moisture problem or this will persist with any floor in the future.

They have been laying glue down solid hardwood for years.I just think it is a bad idea and many agree.
I never advise it for my personal customers.
 
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Old 01-23-07, 03:07 PM
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Thumbs down Moisture Through Concrete!!!

The age old problem seems to be the same all over the world .
Concrete is never water or moisture proof !! .
It has to have a proper sealer on it with no pin holes .
Glued down floors are another problem .
Why would you want to glue down a floor ?? Its a major to repair , its hard to walk on. takes a lot longer to put down etc etc .
These days if people want a glued floor they find someone else i just walk away .
Floating floors are a lot better , havent come across any flooring yet that cant be floated if put down properly ,even bamboo .
MOISTURE FROM ANY SOURCE IS A PROBLEM FOR ANY WOODEN FLOOR ALSO LAMINATES !!!!!
 
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Old 01-23-07, 08:50 PM
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Gluedown is one of my specialties. There are a lot of installers that won't touch a gluedown. That's where I come in and save the day.
 
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Old 01-27-07, 12:03 PM
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I'm not too familiar with a floating floor, the wood floors I have had in the past were glue down (I think). Anyway, what would be difference in feel, looks, sounds, maintenance, etc of a floating floor compared to a glue down floor on concrete? How is a floating floor installed, ie, what keeps it down? And thanks for the input from everyone.
 
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Old 01-27-07, 02:46 PM
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Floating floors are flooring material that is not fastened down, anywhere, hence the term, "floating". It isn't like it actually floats like a stick in water, it is just independent of the subfloor. Laminate floors are, as far as I know, all floating floors. Most engineered wood material is installed as a floating floor, some are either staple, glue, or float, and some are only staple, glue, or both. I would imagine someone still makes a laminate that requires the planks to be glued together, but any I've worked with in several years now just snap together like puzzle pieces. Many of the engineered wood materials still have to be glued together, but some, such as Kahrs, snap together the same as laminates. A floating floor, to the trained ear, is usually pretty obvious as soon as it's walked on. It has a different, more hollow sound to it because there is a layer of air under it and it echos footsteps through that and the cushion that's required under it. When laminates first arrived on the market, they looked pretty phony. But, with the many manufacturers now in the game and the consumer demand for more realistic looking materials, there are many now available that look very good. Laminates cannot be refinished, but are very tough and durable. Engineered wood can be refinished, provided the wear layer is thick enough to allow it. Not all laminates or engineered woods are created equal so shopping price only is normally a mistake.
 
 

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