Installing Floating floor on a slope...


  #1  
Old 01-18-07, 02:38 PM
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Installing Floating floor on a slope...

Here's the thing.
I have to install some flooring but the whole unit is somewhat sloped. The whole building sagged at some point. It has been stabilized completely, but there is no way to level this floor. Carpet might have been a better choice, but the client insisted on floating floor.
The flooring itself is a good quality, and other than the slope, the floor is quite 'even'.
It's just sloped to one side. Several inches from one end to the other, about 35 feet at the longest point.

Any thoughts...???

Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 01-18-07, 05:32 PM
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Dont get chairs with wheels?
Dont set your bowling ball in the entry?
Dont put rollers on the bed?



If the floor is flat but unlevel what have you go to lose?

flat....unlevel.... sounds like a oxymoron
 
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Old 01-18-07, 05:45 PM
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As long as the floor is flat, then you are good to go. Will you be installing the baseboard downhill too?
 
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Old 01-18-07, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
As long as the floor is flat, then you are good to go. Will you be installing the baseboard downhill too?

Naaa...we'll start at the bottom and work up
 
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Old 01-18-07, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ifllc

If the floor is flat but unlevel what have you go to lose?
That's kinda what I thought, but it just feels a little unnatural...
 
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Old 01-18-07, 06:39 PM
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I hear that!

Some time ya gotta throw the guidebook away and just get the job done.

(Then sometimes the lack of the book will bite ya)
 
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Old 01-19-07, 10:14 AM
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Just remember the floor is going to want to slide down hill over time. It may expose the expansion gap on the uphill side.
 
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Old 01-19-07, 10:22 AM
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Good point about the 'sliding down hill.' You might want to explain this to the customer and get her to sign off that she understands that you explained the potential problems associated with the down-hill installation where floor on one end is "several inches" lower. Note the number of inches that the floor is off in order to document it. Give her a copy and keep one for your files.
 
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Old 01-19-07, 12:46 PM
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Very good point Perry. I had thought about this but I was not sure how to explain it. I guess the hope would be that the furniture will keep it in place.
If not, compressible blocks could be place on the lower edge of the slope.
Styrofoam? This would be compressable enough to absorb expansion ....but... would it compress as well due to the slope.....

It is a 64$ question, there is no good answer.

Trial and error on this.
 
 

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