Door Jamb gaps with Laminate.. HELP!!!!

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Old 01-28-07, 02:55 PM
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Door Jamb gaps with Laminate.. HELP!!!!

1. I'm a moron
2. I made a rookie mistake.
3. I need a good fix withOUT pulling up the flooring.

I put down some laminate over some linoleum and did not take off the door jambs when I was doing it so now I have gaps around the door jambs. Don't know if this forum is set up to accept images but if it doesn't, just copy the links minus the [IMG] at each end and that will show you what exactly my problem is.





I need a way to fix/hide these withOUT pulling up the floor and starting over, I already tried to cut out little triangles of laminate to fit each hole but that won't work. Can't run the quarter round all the way around the jamb cause that still leaves a gap. The ONLY think I can think of is to get really big trim to go around the doors to cover it up, just looking for a few more options.

Any help/ideas is GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-28-07, 03:20 PM
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They make "quarter round" for situations like this. It's kind of like a molding.

http://www.pergo.com/shop/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=A126


Oops, didn't read the rest of your post, sorry.


Can you cut pieces of scrap that would fit in there?
 
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Old 01-28-07, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by HotinOKC View Post
They make "quarter round" for situations like this. It's kind of like a molding.

http://www.pergo.com/shop/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=A126


Oops, didn't read the rest of your post, sorry.


Can you cut pieces of scrap that would fit in there?
Already tried that too, that was the little triangles I was talking about. I'm stuck now, like I said, my only option I can think of is to buy som extra big door trim and re-trim all the doors too.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 05:08 PM
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"My only option I can think of is to buy som extra big door trim and re-trim all the doors too." It was be a lot less labor and a lot less expense to simply replace the affected boards and do the installation correctly. Manufacturer's recommended expansion gap should be maintained and door jambs undercut to accommodate the flooring.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 05:35 PM
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I've never tried this, so take it for whatever you think it's worth, OK? My first thought was to cut one of the too short boards in half lengthwise and remove it. You should be able to unsnap each side once it's two pieces. Then remove all the affected boards in the door jamb area. Cut new ones to fit properly and install them from the side opposite the door working toward the door, and install a transition piece to tie the two areas together under the door, as it is closed.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:02 PM
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the only problem with replacing the boards is that they're gonnected on three sides and and it's virtually impossible to just remove select pieces of flooring without damaging the surrounding pieces. and the ones where the gap is at the long end of the board, that would be nightmare.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:19 PM
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Hi sigma2chi-welcome to the DIY forums

You said you tried cutting triangles already but it won't work? How come? Just curious.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:21 PM
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You can jerry rig anything you want!!! It has to be acceptable to you.


My only solution is to remove the affected planks, and undercut the doorjambs, and replace the planks. But you don't want to hear that.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by DIYaddict View Post
Hi sigma2chi-welcome to the DIY forums

You said you tried cutting triangles already but it won't work? How come? Just curious.

because the angles inside the gaps aren't perfectly flush, my lack of experience and lack of correct tools on the initial job saw to that. so the triangles I've cut don't flush up like you would think
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright View Post
You can jerry rig anything you want!!! It has to be acceptable to you.


My only solution is to remove the affected planks, and undercut the doorjambs, and replace the planks. But you don't want to hear that.
Not that I don't want to hear it friend, but I think you've vastly overestimated my talents and experience here. I can fix a car, but a house is a horse of a different color to me. And like I said with these boards interlocking on three different sides, I just can't see as how I could get them up even if I wanted to.

Just thought someone here might know a quick fix. I thought this may have been a common DIY first time error and there would be simple solution like a piece of footing/molding that would hide it perfectly.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 10:20 PM
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Not gaps that big. Replacing the planks is just about your only real option. Anything else will just be a bandaid and look weird. The side joints are the main issue in disassembly. That's why I suggested splitting one of the planks down the center. Then you have, essentially, two planks with one side joint each instead of trying to fight both at once on one plank. The end joints come apart more easily. I'm sure it sounds daunting to an inexperienced installer, but if you can fix a car, you can fix this. Get through the first one and you'll wonder what the fuss was all about.
 
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Old 07-03-07, 07:58 PM
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I am no professional, but you might want to check you local hardware store. You can find a new casing that is flat and much thicker. I believe this would lessen the gap that you have. New thicker moulding may be needed as well to lay even with the new casing. Then a quarter round should cover any remaining gap.

Hope this helps
 
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Old 07-04-07, 06:13 PM
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I would try this. Take a piece of 1x6 6inches tall and put it at the bottom of the door. Then quarter round against the wall. Cut the 6 inches off the existing door trim. Kind of like the old time door casing. Thay had a big chunk at the bottom of the jamb then smaller trim set on top of that the rest of the way up. If the 3/4 width is not enough to cover your gap maybe try some 5/4 treated decking boards they are 1 inch thick. If the 5 1/2 inch looks too big then you could trim it down or use 1x4 instead.
 
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Old 07-04-07, 07:13 PM
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This thread is about 6-7 months old, so hopefully the OP has figured it out by now.
 
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Old 07-06-07, 03:41 PM
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gap in door jam-

I'm sure that I saw some type of "flexible" caulk at Home Depot just for laminate floors in that dept. It came in different colors to match a certain type laminate. I don't know if this would help or not.
 
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Old 02-05-10, 10:38 AM
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Solution Nobody Mentioned

You can cut out only the offending laminate flooring board by slicing through it. Then cut off the bottom of the door jams like instructions show.

Then you can fit in one or two pieces that drop in from the top. You just scrape off the locking ridges that normally require an angled installation.

Then use glue in place of the normal locking ridge.
This allows the boards to slid into place from different angles.
After you have them fitting perfect, then add glue to the
lock area and clamp the board in place.
 
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Old 02-08-10, 12:55 PM
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Sky, no offense, but check the dates on threads before responding to them....the last post in this one was 2007, so hopefully they figured it out by now. Other than that, welcomeBeer 4U2
 
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