Installing Lock 'n Seal Laminate Flooring


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Old 03-11-07, 08:54 AM
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Installing Lock 'n Seal Laminate Flooring

I have a few questions for those of you who have installed this type of flooring from Sam's Club. I'm a TOTAL novice here, so please be patient Thanks!

#1) I will be installing over concrete. The warranty says that I must have " a 6 mil clear plastic sheet must be laid as a vapor barrier before installing Lock 'n Seal laminate flooring" or the warranty will void. My question is, what is this, where can I purchase, it, and how much should I expect to spend? Do I need to buy a Lock 'n Seal brand?

#2) The instructions say to leave 3/8" - 5/8" spacers between the floor and the wall in order to leave room for expansion. What exactly does this mean? Am I supposed to leave a 3-5/8" area between the floor and the wall permanently? Won't things get into that gap?

#3) Moldings - What do most people choose to do as edges around their floors? Do they put floor molding to transition from floor to wall, do they have those baseboard moldings go over the floor? I'm not too familiar with how it is supposed to look, so any help here would be great.

#4) Tools - A lot of floor laying kits come with this "block" that you use to hit the floors together (I guess). Is this necessary? What exactly is this?

#5) Edges - What are you supposed to do with the laminates that run up against the walls? Do you cut the little connections off the edges to make a smooth transition from floor to wall, or does this play into the molding and spacer thing I asked about earlier?

Thank you guys so much! I know this will be easy once I get into it, I just don't want to start without knowing what I'm doing first. Like I said, this is my first time, but I want it to look good and be done right. Thanks again!
 
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Old 03-11-07, 10:18 AM
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You do have alot of questions. Others will probably answer also, and thats ok. My company puts down about one floor a week of laminate flooring. Lock and Seal is just one of many brands. They wll work about the same. first of all, I would probably buy the flooring from a Home Improvement Store like Lowe's, Home Depot, or Menards. Not Sam's Club. If you have problems, the big stores will help you. Sam's Club will give you a loaf of bread. so I have answered your questions in order. #1. 6 ml clear plastic is a roll of plastic 6 ml thick. Pretty thin stuff. In comes in clear or black. The color does not matter. Not expensive. I suppose $25.00 or in that area. #2. when laying this flooring, you do not go up tight against the walls. Stay back or leave a gap of about 3/8" on each wall. Yes, there will be a little gap, but your molding will cover it. Your flooring will expand contract a little. The gap gives it room to move. Make sure you leave you flooring inside your house for 48 hours before laying it. Ideal temp is 70 degrees.
#3. Your floor molding sits on your floor up against your wall. It is attached to the wall. Some only use quarter round, others use 2 1/4 baseboard molding. it is up to you. You will have alot of choices. It sets your room off and gives it a good look.
#4. The block you are referring to is a wooden block, that you lay against the flooring and hit with a hammer to get the flooring tight together. We use rubber hammers for this. Do not hit your flooring with a hammer, you will put a dent in the edge and it will not go together tight.
#5. This is something you will have to learn or have some help on your end. You will be cutting quite a few pieces of flooring. If you start on one wall, you will have to cut the flooring at the other side. Anywhere from 1/4" to 4 or 5 inches. It depends on your room dimensions. You will also have to cut every end as you approach the end walls. Remember to leave 3/8" from all walls. Yes, your floor molding will cover this gap.

Now, I am going to tell you that this will not be an easy job. Read you instructions several times. Practice putting a couple pieces together to get the hang of it. Take your time, go slow, measure correctly, and saw straight.
If you have a problem, stop and just think about it. do what common sense says to do. Have fun and good Luck
 
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Old 03-11-07, 11:22 PM
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We are also installing the Lock'n Seal from Sam's Club. This is our first time doing it. After a rough start, I am loving this. It is now fun to do. At first we watched the videos and tried to do it the way they showed. We couldn't do it. We then tried putting the boards together together in a row and then connecting that row to the previous row and it worked out great. It went together so easy. If you have any problem with any of the material, Sam's will take them back. They are very good on returns.

Joanie
 
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Old 03-12-07, 05:11 AM
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What video are you referring to?
Do you use the block you hit to tighten with?
 
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Old 03-12-07, 11:18 PM
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Uniboard, the company that makes Lock 'n Seal has a video on their web site as do many other manufacturers.

I tried the block but it just ruined the locking system. If there is a tiny space, I use a pull bar. I find it works out much better.

Joanie
 
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Old 01-02-08, 08:00 AM
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Lock 'n Seal Laminate Flooring

First of all I apologize if this is not the correct place for posting a question, but this is my first experience with this website.
I have just purchased from Sam's Club some of the Lock 'n Seal Laminate flooring. My questions pertains to installation around a fireplace. Is there some kind of separate installation kit or tracking system that is needed for this type of installation, etc.? Obviously I wouldn't use molding around the fire place. Please advise.
thanks,
smcd
 
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Old 01-02-08, 09:07 PM
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For straight brick, an endcap reducer, sometimes called a carpet reducer can be used. Or what I like to do for a clean look, is to undercut the brick or stone, like you do doorjamb/cases, so the laminate slides underneath, and still has expansion gaps
 
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Old 10-27-09, 07:47 PM
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We are planning to install laminate and in the corner of living room there is a brick fireplace and there is a brick area that a semi-circle that is on the concrete. We have carpet now and are wondering what we will do when the laminate butts up against the brick?
 
 

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