Hardwood installation in new construction


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Old 04-02-07, 11:55 AM
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Hardwood installation in new construction

I will soon be installing 3/4" thick X 3 1/4' wide oak hardwood flooring in new construction ranch house. The subfloor is 3/4" Advantech.

A few questions...

Can the hardwood be nailed directly to the sub-floor, or do I need to have something in between? If so, what should I use?

For trimming hardwood pieces, what type of blade (how many teeth) do I need for my Miter saw?

Any recommendations as to an pneumatic nailer? (Though I may not have much choice as I'll likely be renting one.)

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-02-07, 12:29 PM
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You can directly nail the wood but you need to be sure the subfloor is level and reduce and high or low spots often seen from irregular framing.

1 - There are different standards or techniques for underlayments or moisture barriers. Many builders use rosin paper or #15 roofing paper. You can follow the NOFMA standards but not all find it necessary. If you have further questions you may want to google this and research further.

2 - Many suggest 60 to 80 tooth blades. I find this to be very suitable for solid hardwood floors.

3 - As far as nailers go it depends on how much flooring you have and how many days it will take to lay down the floor. If you need it for several days then perhaps purchasing one online and reselling it later is a more cost effective route then renting. You can often find used nailers which people did one or two floors and are reselling for a decent price and you can do this also. You may also want to check you local pawn shops. In many areas during the winter months you may find building tools showing up more frequently in the pawn shops.
 
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Old 04-02-07, 01:07 PM
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Thanks for the reply.

I'll look for rosin paper as an underlayment and a 60-80 tooth saw blade.

We have ~1600 ft^2 of hardwood to lay and it will be done by a weekend evening crew and probably be scattering of nights. I think I know where I can rent a nail gun for $22 a day and only pay for days we use it, so if it sits for a few days I'm not charged - I just have to be honest on the number of days I use it.

Since I don't know if there's a pawn shop locally, I'll check out ebay.
 
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Old 04-02-07, 03:28 PM
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If you are installing in new construction, doors and windows need to be installed and closed and HVAC system up and running for a few days to get the moisture out of the house. Then, the hardwood is placed in the home in the rooms where it is to be installed in order to acclimate (adjust) to the temperature and humidity of the specific areas where it is to be installed. Basement should be dry. Crawl space should be dry and soil covered with 8 mil minimum polypropylene vapor retarder overlapped and taped and run up sides of foundation and attached.

The National Oak Flooring Manufacturer's Assoc. (NOFMA) recommends 15# minimum roofing felt as the vapor retarder for solid 3/4" hardwood flooring. The most important guidelines are the manufacturer's. You can go to www.nofma.org and click Publications and download for free their technical manual on hardwood flooring installation.
 
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Old 04-03-07, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
If you are installing in new construction, doors and windows need to be installed and closed and HVAC system up and running for a few days to get the moisture out of the house. Then, the hardwood is placed in the home in the rooms where it is to be installed in order to acclimate (adjust) to the temperature and humidity of the specific areas where it is to be installed. Basement should be dry. Crawl space should be dry and soil covered with 8 mil minimum polypropylene vapor retarder overlapped and taped and run up sides of foundation and attached.
We should be good as the doors and windows are all in and we've had temporary heat (though it's warm enough we don't need it right now) for the last month or so as the drywall has been finished. Hardwood has ben in the garage where it's basically been the same temp as the house for the last couple of weeks. When the ceilings are painted, we'll get the flooring inside the house. We've has a dehumidifier running in the basement for the last few weeks.

The National Oak Flooring Manufacturer's Assoc. (NOFMA) recommends 15# minimum roofing felt as the vapor retarder for solid 3/4" hardwood flooring. The most important guidelines are the manufacturer's. You can go to www.nofma.org and click Publications and download for free their technical manual on hardwood flooring installation.
I will look into this. Thanks.
 
 

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