transition problem from higher tile floor to lower laminate

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Old 04-10-07, 07:24 AM
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transition problem from higher tile floor to lower laminate

I am in the process of pulling all the carpet in my downstairs and replacing it with laminate flooring. This consists of my dining room (working ion now), family room and living room. These 3 rooms had carpet so is all the same height.

However I have found out that the builder reinforced the kitchen and hall with an extra layer of 1/4 inch playwood. This in itself wouldnt be so bad, however I have laid 1/4 inch tile on top of that.

SOOO I now have over 1/2 inch of drop from the tile to the subfloor of the dining and family rooms. With the laminate I am using I get about 1/4 inch of heigth.

So my question is this. How do i transition form a higher (by 1/4 inch) tile floor to the lower laminate floor? (ps the end of the tile was not capped as it was covered with a metal drop down transition and wouldnt show)

Thanks so much in advance!! Any thoughts or ideas would be great!
 
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Old 04-10-07, 12:23 PM
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you can either lay an additional 1/4 plywood over the lower floor (not that big a deal - we did it, and you'll be VERY glad you did, too) or get a reducer strip to transition the difference.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 07:33 AM
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Ok I tested it out with a reducer strip. I will have to lay at least a 1/4 strip of play wood down to just be able to screw the transition joint into it.

I see where the builder was coming from in adding the height to the kitchen wich was lanoleum, so it would be level with the carpet, however is this done in all homes?

The other problem I have is that the entrance is tile as well and they added the extra height there also. So now the entry way will have a step down as well. Humm this may not work out to nicley.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 11:18 AM
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yes, it's normal to add 1/4 PLYwood (not play wood) under linoleum, because it's so thin, to make it the same height as a carpeted area. we had that situation. we had lino in the kitchen and carpet in the dining room. we wanted laminate in both rooms. so after we ripped up the carpet, we had to lay 1/4 plywood in just the dining room to make both rooms level with each other. it's really not that big a deal. do it right.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 01:58 PM
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Ok. If I am going to add 1/4 ply wood (not play wood) how well do I need to nail this down to the original ply wood?

Actually how would I nail this down? along the same seems and into the floor joists or just into the ply wood that is already there?
 
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Old 04-11-07, 02:10 PM
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the new 1/4" plywood's seams should be staggered over the existing. don't line the new stuff up exactly over the existing stuff. and just nail the new into the old. i believe i recall seeing the pro's here saying to nail every 6" and about 1" from the edges, but i think we nailed every foot (oops).
 
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Old 04-11-07, 02:27 PM
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I'm assuming the kitchen and entry are sheet vinyl and not really linoleum. These two terms are used improperly in today's world. Linoleum is still available, but is pretty pricey and most folks are actually putting in vinyl but calling it linoleum. Although they look quite a bit alike, they employ two different installation methods. Sheet vinyl is a fairly unforgiving product where floor prep is concerned. When the glue dries that holds it down, it shrinks which will draw the vinyl down into any little imperfection in the floor and cause it to telegraph through to the surface of the vinyl and be visible. Consequently, an underlayment is required in order to install sheet vinyl. This underlayment must be an approved material made specifically for this purpose and ordinary 1/4 inch plywood is not. It has too many voids in it and can cause problems with the installation. In any case, this is why there is additional material under the vinyl, it had to be there for the material to be warranted by the manufacturer. One way to handle the transition between the new laminate and the existing vinyl is to install a reducer that is normally used to transition laminate to concrete or sheet vinyl that has no underlayment under it. This transition piece has one side that is designed to lip over the laminate and the other side is designed to step down to the lower surface with a bull nose look. If you use this same piece but use it in reverse, it will do the job. Put the side designed to lip over the laminate on the vinyl side of the floor so it lips over the vinyl instead and let the bull nose side sit on top of the laminate. This will transition the two materials and save the expense of sheeting the rest of the floor. You'll need to put a 1/4 inch piece of material under the track that the transition piece goes into in order to raise it up so the transition piece can reach it, but, other than that it will work fine. I've done it many times.
I just noticed this originally started talking about the existing floor being tile and somehow became vinyl. In any case, the transition I've suggested will do the job.
 

Last edited by Smokey49; 04-11-07 at 02:35 PM. Reason: Better info
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Old 04-12-07, 06:45 AM
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Thanks! actually it was originally vynal howevr i pulled that up and layed tile. so instead of the thin vynle it has another 1/4 of tile.

I am planning on using the reducer that you mentioned. I was just worried that it was to much of a drop. Ohh well. I plan to seel the home next spring anyway so you live and learn

thanks again
 
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Old 04-12-07, 07:28 AM
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I've used that reducer to go from tile to laminate several times and it works great. Unless the tile is something really thick, it comes out just about right.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 07:47 AM
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while we are on the reducer subject.

Can you tell me how much room I need between the tile and the laminate floor to install the reducer?

IE the track the reducer goes on needs to be in the middle between the tile and laminate. But how much room total do I need between?

IE 1/4" from tile to track
1/4" for track
1/4" from track to laminate

So that would mean a total distance between fo 3/4"

Would that be correct?

thanks again for all the help
 
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