Installing laminate in bathroom


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Old 05-28-07, 05:17 AM
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Question Installing laminate in bathroom

I installed laminate flooring earlier this year in my kitchen and dining room and it looks great. I would like to install the same type on through the laundry and into the adjoining bathroom. I read a lot of horror stories about laminate in bathrooms(this is a full bath with shower). Is there a better alternative that installs like the laminate? I have never installed ceramic floor tile. I have installed vinyl tile with adhesive on the back, but I just don't like the way it looks. Is there a way to seal the edges of the laminate so that the expansion and contraction characteristic is maintained and I can still protect the flooring from water damage?

Thanks in advance!!
 
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Old 05-28-07, 07:53 AM
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The claim is, yes, the seams can be sealed as you go. The experience is, it doesn't work very well. This is just not a material you should use in wet areas like that. How about one of the no glue sheet vinyls on the market? Several of them come in wood grain patterns, one of which may compliment your existing floor well. They are intensely easy to install, are pretty floor prep friendly, and are made for this application.
 
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Old 05-29-07, 12:16 PM
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Hi Tim, You can absolutely put laminate in a bathroom, but you need to do your homework to choose the right one. The inexpensive ones that you find at the big box stores will most likely not work. They have no moisture resistance at all. Better quality manufactures like Mannington, Quick-step and Alloc all take steps to make their core moisture resistant. In high moisture areas its a good idea to fill the expansion joint with a silicon caulk to seal it. Silicon will remain flexible so that it doesn't hinder the expansion and contraction.
 
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Old 05-30-07, 08:50 PM
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Do a google search on a laminate called Konecto
 
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Old 06-07-07, 04:35 AM
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Konecto is a great choice and is very durable, but its not a laminate its a vinyl plank 6"x36" with overlapping self adhesive edges. Its a floating floor like a laminate so you still need an expansion gap on the edges at least an 1/8". Make sure your sub floor is smooth and flat, imperfections in the sub floor can telegraph through the vinyl. like I said its a great product ive sold it many times the only problem ive ever had is when it was installed over radiant heat. for some reason it dried out the adhesive strip and the whole floor curled up. Metrofloor gave the customer the run around and told her that it wasn't warranted in Maine over radiant heat. so we ended up replacing her floor for her
 
 

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