Flooring for flood zone


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Old 05-30-07, 02:38 PM
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Smile Flooring for flood zone

Ground floor of home in flood zone. Home owner wants cement floor covered with something that will not be destroyed by flood water of, let's say, an inch of water for a day or 2. Owner says he'll take up the floor after a flood, wash it, dry it, and re-install it. Is there a flooring product that could withstand this? Suggestions?
 
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Old 05-30-07, 03:22 PM
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Ceramic tile would be the least affected floor covering in the event of a flood. Wood floor would have to be replaced. Vinyl would likely have to be replaced because moisture would get under it and there would be mold and mildew. Carpet cushion would have to be replaced. While in theory one could possibly remove carpet and professionally clean and reinstall, the logistics of putting it somewhere until the flood mess is cleaned up and the house dehumidified before installation could take days. Too, carpet in standing water for two days will result in mold and mildew and likely delamination of backing. If sills for studs are 2x4" (actual dimensions 1-1/2" x 3-1/2"), 2" of water on floor also means water in the walls, wet insulation, and mold and mildew problems.
 
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Old 05-30-07, 05:33 PM
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Tile wouldn't be affected as mentioned above, could also just go with stained concrete. What's nice about stained concrete is that you can also create a tile look by scoring the concrete as if it had grout lines and in any size you'd like. Could also go with Mannington iCORE laminate which is waterproof but expensive.
 
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Old 05-30-07, 07:00 PM
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Acid-etched and concrete is trendy in some circles. Area rugs could be used. Laminates with a plastic core are waterproof, but laminate would have to be removed to clean and disinfect the subfloor and to prevent mold and mildew problems.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 08:00 AM
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Question

Speaking of insulation. The insulation sub suggests using foam insulation or something else other than fiberglass batting. The wall covering, instead of sheet rock, we thought about vinyl sheets on the bottom half and treated plywood on the top. Comments?

Wall covering screwed on so it can be removed to clean behind and perhaps replace the insulation, if need be.
 
 

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