Laminate flooring and wheelchairs


  #1  
Old 07-12-07, 01:26 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Smile Laminate flooring and wheelchairs

We have a double wide mobile home and want to rip out the carpet in the bedroom. It looks like particle board/plywood underneath. We are considering the "swiftlock" style laminate flooring and the stick-on vinyl tiles for the ease and quickness of installation (we'd like to have it completed in 1-2 days). My questions are: 1) Does anyone know how well each of these flooring hold up to wheelchairs and lifts used to changeover people from the bed to the wheelchair? (It's not exactly a high traffic area, but the lift and chair would be rolling over it multiple times a day.) 2) What type of sub-floor prep would be needed for the stick-on tiles, would concrete board work, if needed? 3)What types of tools are needed for the laminate floor installation?
Thanks for any and all advice!
 
  #2  
Old 07-12-07, 02:11 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,241
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Given your situation, I don't believe I'd use either of the products you've named. I would suggest looking at one of the no glue sheet vinyls on the market. Less issues with floor prep, very simple to install, not many tools needed, and can be done in the time frame you need. It comes in wood grain or tile patterns. Heres a shot of one completed.

http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q72/Smokey49/vinylprep024.jpg
 
  #3  
Old 07-13-07, 03:36 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
I have a handicap client whose whole house is laminate (kitchen, Livingroom, Dining and Den) and I have not noticed any issues. She has multiple wheelchairs and scooters (one for around the house, another for travel etc.). I would suggest talking with flooring suppliers about durability of particular brands of laminate. You get what you pay for and the cheaper varieties may not stand up to the beating you will give it.

I also have had several people tell me that a no glue vinyl floor tends to "travel" when you slide furniture, chairs, etc. over them. I have also seen instances where table and chairs have left permanent indentations in the flooring from weight (like the footprints your couch leaves in carpet). The floor I looked at was an exceptionally soft variety (if that makes sense).

The only thing I cannot comment on is the "Lift" you talk about. Can't get a picture in my head so I don't know what to comment on.
 
  #4  
Old 07-13-07, 03:59 PM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,754
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
czizzi,

I believe the lift is comparable to a engine hoist but with seat with straps.

My father-in law has these lifts, but they are built into the ceilings.
 
  #5  
Old 07-13-07, 07:32 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Another favorable flooring choice for this situation could be a Luxury Vinyl Tile. They come in squares similar to the "peel and stick" kind, but are more commercial grade and designed to take traffic. Many Supermarkets in my area (southeast Virginia) have this type of tile at the entryway to the store. It can take the full force of commercial traffic and hold up. Google - Adura Luxury Tiles by Mannington for an example. The website in my opinion does not do the product justice. Visit a local flooring showroom to see in person, I think you will be impressed. It goes down with a pressure sensative adhesive that is trowelled onto your floor. If you have particle board, I would suggest a 1/4" Luan layer be placed down over the particle board. This may be your solution. Good Luck and bring in the lift.....this floor can take it.
 
  #6  
Old 07-13-07, 08:29 PM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,754
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
If your budget can accomidate laminate, then you can look into getting a laminate floor with a AC rating of 4 and it should be plenty strong and durable for your needs. AC4 rated laminate is usually found in hotel rooms, hospitals, and other areas where it will see high traffic. They will come in the same colors/texture as normal residential laminate. It is more expensive, so it might not even be feasible for you.
 
  #7  
Old 07-16-07, 12:12 AM
datimster's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
As long as the wheels of the wheelchair are clean, you should be ok. The problem won't be loading, as laminate flooring will tend to be quite robust... The "soft" floor was probably not laminate flooring. In the end, it'll be the really small things, e.g., small rocks lodged in the wheelchair wheels that end up causing scratches, etc. (see http://laminateflooring.gig8.com/index.php?topic=7416.0)

Best of luck!

/t
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: