Mapei Planipatch?!


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Old 08-29-07, 12:43 PM
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Angry Mapei Planipatch?!

Does the Mapei Planipatch HAVE to be mixed with anything else besides water? In other words can I just buy the bag of Planipatch or will I have additives I HAVE to buy as well? I was reading there online PDF from there website & in the directions it makes it out like you have to mix it with this "Embossing Leveler" called Planipatch Plus. Do you have to use this additive or is it for special applications? There PDF made this very confusing. TIA for any help!

-Jonathan
 
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Old 08-29-07, 07:36 PM
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I've never read that on a bag of Planipatch, but that doesn't mean it isn't there. Embossing leveler is a product designed to float out, or level, the embossing in sheet vinyl. It has to be sticky enough to adhere well to sheet vinyl and has to be capable of being spread very thinly so it just fills in the embossing but doesn't leave a real layer anywhere else. Unless you're putting a layer of sheet vinyl over another layer of sheet vinyl, you don't need this additive. I've used lots of Planipath and just mixed it with water. I suppose it may be some wrinkle I'm unaware of, but I don't think so. Embossing leveler is pretty pricey and this may be an additive so you can use the Planipatch as such without having to buy a different product. So how's the laminate project going?
 
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Old 08-30-07, 05:19 AM
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Talking Smokey!

Wow, long time no see Smokey! I figured you'd gone on vacation or something. Haven't seen you around here for a week or so. Yeah that's what I figured about the Planipatch. There online data sheet is just a bit misleading the way they word things, so I figured I'd ask you guys who have probably used it many times before. Thanks for clearing that up for me.

The laminate project is going pretty good. I haven't started laying it like I planned to do during the week because of a neck injury but it's feeling a lot better now so I should be ready to start Saturday on the actual laying. Between now & then I'm working on leveling or "flattening" my slab. I'm afraid it's going to be a serious PITA from what I've found but I could be wrong. Overall the room is pretty flat with a few small depressions here & there but that's not a problem, my problem is right by the wall I planned on starting from, the wall common to the living room & bedroom, there are some fairly high "lumps" in the slab, they're all right in front of the actual framing, which you can see from the gap left bewtween the sheetrock & slab after removing the base molding.

I don't really want to bring the whole slab up to that level because then you'd have to step up a little to enter the living room. So I'm kind of at a stand still as to how I should go about getting these lumps down. Grinding? Chipping? Chipping as much as I can & then grinding? I'm really not sure what the best approach to this would be since I haven't really ever had to flatten a slab for something like this. Any thoughts or ideas?

Glad your back Smokey I'm sure you'll be able to help.

TIA
 
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Old 08-30-07, 05:49 AM
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No vacation, just too much work lately.

All of the above, or a combination of some sort. Chipping first will help cut down the dust from grinding and mean you don't have to grind as much. You are, however, correct about the pain factor. This kind of work is just that, WORK.
 
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Old 08-30-07, 06:07 AM
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Yeah that's what I was thinking about the chipping & grinding, I'll probably use the combination of the two like you said. The way I see it, it would be better to chip & grind too far down than not enough since I can always fill it in later?!

I guess I'll get to chipping & grinding this evening or tommorow. I need my wife to be out of the house, with her being pregnant I don't want her around all that concrete dust cause I've heard it's really bad for pregnant women.
 
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Old 08-30-07, 02:30 PM
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Yes, in this instance, too much is better than not enough. Your Planipatch will work fine to fill it in.
 
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Old 08-30-07, 07:08 PM
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I take my diamond blade in my angle grinder and stratigically set up my vac, and make cross cuts about 2 inches apart. Then I use my demo hammer(mini jack hammer) with a good chisel bit, and get it out. It is actually less dusty then trying to totally grind it down. Yes, you can always screed across it.

The additive is for going over sheet vinyl as an embossing compound, or when covering old black cutback adhesive residue.
 
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Old 08-31-07, 04:54 AM
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Thumbs up Good thinking

Great idea CDW about the diamond blade & crosscutting. I don't have a demo hammer but I can chip my crosscuts down with a hammer & chissel. I have always heard you cant use the diamond blades in angle grinders. I thought they were only for hand saws or table saws. Do they make a special kind for angle grinders or is it fine to use any dry cut blade with your angle grinder provided it's the correct size!?
 
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Old 08-31-07, 04:37 PM
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I have a 4" dry cut diamond blade, for my angle grinder. I have a big special dry cut diamond blade in my undercut saw, for undercutting masonry, and it is just a big angle grinder, with a special base.
 
 

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