best way to level a wavy hardwood floor to install laminate?


  #1  
Old 09-15-07, 08:08 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Michigan
Posts: 131
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
best way to level a wavy hardwood floor to install laminate?

Hello all,

My oak hardwood floor has alot of big gaps and from reading this site wood filler is a no-no. So we will not be refinishing the floors. I would like to put laminate down but my floor is pretty wavy and un-flat. I figure my options are the following and am hoping someone can maybe tell me the best way to go about it.

First about the floor. Subfloor is 1x4 slats run diagonally(old home) with 1" gaps between each slat. Hardwood is nailed on top of this.

1. some type of leveling compound(I would need quite a bit and the stuff seems pretty expensive)

2. shimming the low spots somehow using the shingle method or pieces of wood but not sure how you would feather the edges of the wood/shingles into the floor.

3. cut out the flooring/subfloor around the perimeter of the rooms I want to laminate and put down a plywood subfloor. I understand I would probably have to shim the ply to make the floor level. Also not sure if this method would hurt anything structual as far as how the house is tied together.

My home is small at only 750sq.ft. The area I want to to is around 400sq.ft. which is the living room at 200sq.ft. and two bedrooms each around 100sq.ft. not sure how the bedroom floors are yet as there is still carpet down.

Any input advice would be greatly appreciated. I'm a pretty handy DIY'r just never did anything like this before. Our last option will be to put down carpet again but we really don't want to.

Thank you.
Ron
 
  #2  
Old 09-15-07, 08:45 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,163
Received 1,273 Upvotes on 1,213 Posts
Are the waves in the subfloor or the hardwood? On the off chance it's just the hardwood, I'd pull that up.
 
  #3  
Old 09-16-07, 05:50 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Michigan
Posts: 131
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I would guess it's in the subfloor/floor joists. The house is 60 years old. From what I've learned on this site it's usually the subfloor/floor joists that have settled.

ron
 
  #4  
Old 09-17-07, 09:39 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Michigan
Posts: 131
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I was wrong on the subfloor. They are 1x6 slats, not 1x4's.
 
  #5  
Old 09-17-07, 07:11 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 13
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Smile Leveling your subfloor

I found the best way to check for HI-Low spots is in the dark take a flashlight and lay it on the floor. You will see high spots plain as day. Then Sand hi spots and fill low spots.

Hope this helps,

F-7
 
  #6  
Old 09-17-07, 08:53 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 4,857
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
When you build up using shingles and roofing felt, build it like an odd shaped pyrimid.
 
  #7  
Old 09-18-07, 06:18 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Michigan
Posts: 131
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If using shingles/roofing felt won't you still have and edge from the shingle that needs to be feathered into the floor somehow? Can someone expain to me the shingle/roofing felt process? I mean I have an idea but a good tutorial is always helpful.

Using some type of leveling compound might be the way to go but one of my very low spots is at the transition into the kitchen(linoleum floor). That means I would have to make a mini form(like you would for concrete)to keep the leveling compound from going onto the kitchen floor. Is this exceptable? I would just worry about it crumbling over time while being walked on. There would of course be a transition moulding in place but not sure how much that would help.

Thanks for all the help,
ron
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: