What tool needed to undercut wooden door casing? (Threshold)


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Old 09-18-07, 07:48 AM
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What tool needed to undercut wooden door casing? (Threshold)

I want to undercut a wooden door casing so that I can slide a floating floor under it. What tool is needed to do this? Thanks.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 08:47 AM
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Welcome to the DoItYourself.com forums

You can use an undercut saw.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 09:09 AM
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Something like the picture below? Can I rent one of those?

 
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Old 09-18-07, 09:26 AM
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That's the tool.

You might be able to find one to rent - there's also the hand powered version which is like a dovetail saw - the handle is parallel to and offset from the blade - probably available at better building supplies with a good tool section.

BTW - Sometimes referred to as a jamb saw.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 09:39 AM
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How many do you have to cut? If it's only a few doors (casing), I'd go with the hand powered one as George stated. If you're not on a budget, and have lots of doors, go with that one. It'll save you a lot of time.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 09:50 AM
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I recently did a floating floor and used a pull saw to cut the door trim. Just put a scrap piece of floor next to the trim (so you get the right height) and then cut away.

I love this thing, and the blade is flexible so it works well in tight spots: http://www.vaughanmfg.com/bearsaw_frameset.html
 
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Old 09-18-07, 10:18 AM
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Thanks for the replies. My wife went to the local hardware store and told them that we needed to undercut a door casing, and they told her to buy one of these:



Is that the "hand powered" version that you guys are talking about? Because if it is, I don't understand how it could be used to cut a piece from the door casing that is about 8 mm in height and 12 mm in depth. I mean, with that kind of saw I could cut a slit in the wood, but not a groove. Somebody pretty please enlighten me.

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 11:01 AM
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That's the type I was talking about. I'm not sure I understand why you can't do it but it should be something like this:

http://www.krono.com/cms/bilder/popu...619/9_verl.jpg

You need to cut through the casing so the piece you cut comes off.

Does that help?
 
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Old 09-18-07, 12:09 PM
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First of all, thanks to all for being patient with me.

Maybe I'm using the wrong terminology and "casing" is incorrect. What I have is an exterior door. Under the door and over the slab there is a piece of wood (sill?) that is about 1" in height. This piece of wood makes a seal with the rubber "flap" at the bottom of the door. I assume that I need to cut a slot in that piece of wood so that the floating floor can slide under it, and there is no visible transition. The only other thing I can think of is to finish the floor 0.25" from the sill and use a quarter round to cover the gap.

Here is a picture:



That piece of wood, with the four screws, that's what I'm talking about.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 12:43 PM
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Ahhhh....

Yeah, we're all talking about different things. No worries. Casing is around the door frame. What you're talking about, you don't undercut that. I'm not a pro around here as I've only installed a floating floor once so I'm not exactly sure what would be the BEST way to do that, so check back as I know a pro will chime in here.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 09-19-07 at 08:22 AM.
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Old 09-18-07, 01:41 PM
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The previous owner had laminate installed and what they did was put a modified transition by the door. Basically what they did was lay a transition bracket close to the door framing and cut the t-molding after the area that inserts into the bracket and butts up against the door framing (like cutting one side of the 'T' off). Hardly noticeable at all but not sure if there is a better way.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 01:49 PM
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Smile No Pro either

I dont know what your plans are, wheather you took OFF all the baseboards and will replace them to cover the expansion gaps between the wall and the floor or you left the baseboards ON and you planned on covering the expansion gaps with base shoe. I left the baseboard's ON and covered my gaps with base shoe which I painted to match the white baseboards. Then I stained a piece of base shoe to match the floor to cover the gap in that area by the door. It worked well and looks good. They make a piece for that area too, think its called an end cap. Hope that made some sence.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 03:30 PM
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The piece you are attempting to transition to is called a threshold. The suggestion 12thirteen made will work. Get a piece of end cap, install the track so it is about a quarter or three eighths of an inch from the the threshold, trim the nose of the end cap so it will butt up to the threshold, snap it into place when the time comes, and caulk between the end cap and threshold to keep water, dirt, and so on, out of there.

The suggestion gglefty gave will also work and will be less expensive. End cap can be a bit pricey. The draw back with it is in getting the stain color right and attaching it.

Another option is a bit more elaborate, but doesn't involve additional materials. If the door is a wooden door and you can afford the extra height, remove the threshold. Put a shim under it that is the same thickness as the finished height of the new floor but not as wide as the threshold. Install the laminate so it has the required expansion gap from the shim, then re-install the threshold. The threshold then lips over the laminate and hides the edge of it. This produces a clean, seamless transition that looks less like a laminate floor. The bottom of the door will need to be trimmed the amount the threshold was raised.

You can also do as you had originally planned, but it's tough to get an edge that looks nice that way. In either case, the threshold must be removed and re-installed after the laminate is finished. Unless you start at the threshold and it is the first piece installed, you won't be able to get the planks to lock together at the threshold with out modification if you're going to slide the laminate under the threshold.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 04:33 PM
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Smile Trim piece

PS.......... You didnt say if you had one but I also used the base shoe to trim around my brick fireplace. I attached the base shoe to the threshold with a couple dabs of liquid nails and did the same with the fireplace trim. Yes, the end caps can get pricey. I had extra trim and some wood stain about the same color of my floor so I just tried it. It worked well and looked good for me. If you do this method just make sure you get stainable trim.
 
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Old 09-18-07, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Cuminato
Thanks for the replies. My wife went to the local hardware store and told them that we needed to undercut a door casing, and they told her to buy one of these:



Is that the "hand powered" version that you guys are talking about? Because if it is, I don't understand how it could be used to cut a piece from the door casing that is about 8 mm in height and 12 mm in depth. I mean, with that kind of saw I could cut a slit in the wood, but not a groove. Somebody pretty please enlighten me.

Thanks.
Lay a piece of the flooring you are installing upside down against the casing, and set the saw down flat on the piece of flooring and cut the door casing all the way through. that will set the hieght that you need to slide the flooring under the casing.
 
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Old 09-19-07, 08:21 AM
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Great instructions flooring dude on that question.

However, the topic kind of changed when he's really talking about the threshold.
 
 

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