Removing Excess Stain from Hardwood Floor

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-01-07, 09:12 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mount Laurel
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Removing Excess Stain from Hardwood Floor

I allowed my wife and her mom to apply a Minwax stain to the hardwood floor I had just finished sanding. I read the directions - since I am no expert - and explained to them to apply it then wipe away the excess after 15 minutes. I returned to the room about 20 minutes later and the entire floor was coated in stain. What are the reprecussions of not removing the excess stain? Is there anything I can do to fix the problem at this point.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-01-07, 03:36 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,502
Received 293 Votes on 260 Posts
The biggest problem with not removing the excess stain is it is hard for the wood to soak up all the stain and what lays on top doesn't dry very well. Often when the sealer is applied it will start to lift some of the excess stain

I usually wipe off the excess stain in 5-10 minutes, sometimes less. At the 20 minute mark you could have wiped with a wet thinner rag and probably done ok but I'd be leary of doing so now.

How does the stain look? what type of finish are you planning to use?
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-07, 07:40 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mount Laurel
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am happy with how the stain looks. But you are right, it is "gummy" If you touch it, it almost feels wet, but nothing really comes up.

I used the Minwax stain and it recommends using their Polyurethane product. That is what I bought and that is what I am planning on using. At this point it seems I should just apply the polyurethane and see what happens.

I am just really disappointed because I went out of my way and put a lot of time and effort into sanding the floor correctly - and I finally got the hang of it after 2 days and a lot of back pain - only to have it mucked up by my wife and her impatient mom. They are always rushing to get something done. I guess I should have done it myself. -done venting-
 
  #4  
Old 10-02-07, 09:38 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mount Laurel
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Response from Minwax

I had almost given up on Minwax, but I got a response from them after I described what happened :


Thank you for visiting our website and taking the time to contact Minwax. We appreciate your interest in our products. You should never apply the clear coat over stain that has not dried, as this may prolong drying time and curing of top coat products and can even cause failure of the top coat.

If this is the case, we recommend wiping the stained surface down with 100% pure mineral spirits. Use a soft lint-free cloth (old cotton t-shirts work well) dampened with 100% mineral spirits to wipe off the excess stain from the surface of the wood. Keep turning the rag and wiping until no more stain comes off on the rag. Any stain that has absorbed into the wood and dried will not be affected by the mineral spirits. If the stain has dried in some areas but you did not wipe the excess stain within the recommended time, substitute Minwax Refinisher for the mineral spirits and use the same technique to remove the stain from the surface. Even if the stain feels
dry to the touch, it cannot cure fully if applied incorrectly.

After wiping with the solvent, allow the surface to dry. Mineral spirits and Refinisher will evaporate quickly. If you still need to deepen the color, you may apply another thin coat of stain after letting the stain dry for 4-6 hours. Allow stain to penetrate into wood for 5-15 minutes before wiping stain with a clean, dry, lint-free cloth.

The Minwax Wood Finishes are pigmented stains. If the stain color is not completely absorbed into wood grain, the pigment will remain on surface of wood and not cure. The amount of stain you can apply to a specific wood type depends upon the porosity and grain depth of the wood. There will be
a saturation point for most wood types limiting how much stain pigment the wood will absorb. The darker the stain color generally the more pigmentation present. If the stain pigments and resins do not penetrate into the wood grain they may stay active indefinitely.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: