Do room directions of wood planks need to match

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-07-07, 05:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Exclamation Do room directions of wood planks need to match

I have put the floors down in 2 of 3 rooms. I did the the largest room (soo proud). I ran the planks to match the direction of the longest wall. When you walk into the room you are walking into the planks - so they run long ways.

My 2nd room - logic tells me to run the planks width wise, which means that these will be laid in a different direction that the first room. IS THAT OK? I want this to look professional and not a hack job.

The reason the room seems like it should be laid width wise:
Room is 118 x 147 - so I should lay the planks along the wall that is 147, that means you walk into the planks laid width wise, which is the opposite direction of the other bedroom.

to slightly complicate it - when you walk inthe room, theres a square entrance (which will have new wood floors) that is 29 x 29). So, the other consideration is, in this little area is it better to have my planks laying from side to side or front to back.

I am leaning towards comitting to running it along the longest wall and having my rooms all be different. BUT - I WANT TO DO WHAT IS INDUSTRY STANDARD ACCEPTED PRACTICE.

PLEASE HELP
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-07-07, 05:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Solid hardwood flooring is laid perpendicular to (across) the joist for support reasons.
 
  #3  
Old 11-07-07, 05:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
sorry - let me clarify, i am laying on concrete. so I can lay in any direction. Unless its "incorrect" to have different rooms laid differently, that's my plan. Would like any input. I'm in AZ, so I do't see many wood floors to know if this is done or not.
 
  #4  
Old 11-07-07, 05:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Solid hardwood can be installed above grade on concrete, not below grade in basement. If installing plywood or OSB over vapor retarder directly to concrete, then you can install wood in any direction you choose. If you are installing over sleeper system, then solid hardwood would be installed across the sleepers.

Go to www.nofma.org and download for free at the National Oak Flooring Manufacturers Association website the publication Installing Wood Floors.
 
  #5  
Old 11-07-07, 05:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
sorry - let me clarify, i am laying on concrete. so I can lay in any direction. Unless its "incorrect" to have different rooms laid differently, that's my plan. Would like any input. I'm in AZ, so I do't see many wood floors to know if this is done or not.
 
  #6  
Old 11-07-07, 05:44 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Are you installing solid hardwood? Did you install vapor retarder and plywood or OSB for nailing into? Or, did you install vapor retarder with sleeper system with plywood or OSB on top for nailing into?

If you are installing solid hardwood into plywood or OSB installed over vapor retarder and attached to concrete, you can install any direction you want. If installing solid hardwood, the www.nofma.org technical manual explains both ways of installation on above grade concrete.

When you refer to 'planks,' it is not clear if you are installing solid, engineered wood, or laminate. Please clarify.
 
  #7  
Old 11-07-07, 07:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 254
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Generally speaking, the flooring should run longitudinally with the house since the floor joists (I realize you don't have any) would be installed across the shorter dimension. I'm referring to the house as a whole, not the individual rooms. Will the rooms be tied together by flooring in the hallway, or just the individual rooms floored separately?
 
  #8  
Old 12-12-07, 10:02 AM
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Long Island,NY
Posts: 137
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
We had the same issue-Which way to run the wood. We ran it the long way in the livingroom. We cut an entranceway into the den and were putting wood there also. We decided to run it like it continues from the livingroom (even thought it is a step down) to make both rooms appear bigger. However, the den should be run the other way since the wood guy said it was proper to run it the direction of the long way. This was against what our reason was and we did it our way. He did say another thing to evaluate is it looks nicer if you walk into the room with the direction of the flooring as well.
 
  #9  
Old 12-12-07, 10:12 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I ran 3/4 hardwood lengthwise in my kitchen and in the next room ran it at an angle to the entire room (45degrees) - finished product looked fantastic, differentiating the rooms, but maintaining the finish of the flooring through out the entire house.... It's a matter of taste.... nothing more, nothing less...
 
  #10  
Old 12-26-07, 02:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 359
Received 2 Votes on 1 Post
I grew up in an old farm house with the original wood flooring. The wood ran longways down the hall, then changed direction as you turned to go into a room. So, whether that is right or not, that is what they did in a farmhouse in KY over 100 years ago. FWIW.
 
  #11  
Old 12-26-07, 06:43 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,074
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The direction of the joist is what is going to dictate the direction of the flooring, or if you will need additional plywood or blocking.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: