dry lay engineered wood first, ok?


  #1  
Old 01-01-08, 09:18 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
dry lay engineered wood first, ok?

Not installing until the spring but trying to find all my answers before I start. Since I'll be gluing down this floor and I haven't seen reference to it for engineered wood, would it make sense to dry lay sections at a time, just to get all my cuts right and prevent mistakes before laying floor on the glue?
 
  #2  
Old 01-01-08, 12:36 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,184
Received 1,280 Upvotes on 1,218 Posts
I've never put down a wood floor, but I like to do a dry layout when I put down tile and the concept seems the same.
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-08, 07:56 AM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 4,857
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by retgi
Not installing until the spring but trying to find all my answers before I start. Since I'll be gluing down this floor and I haven't seen reference to it for engineered wood, would it make sense to dry lay sections at a time, just to get all my cuts right and prevent mistakes before laying floor on the glue?
That is exactly what I do, when I start an installation, or when I know my next controlled glue spread, will be a complicated area.

Keep measuring out about 2- 3 feet and pop a line, to control your glue spread.

When I start I work from a popped line, back to the wall, out 2 or 3 feet. Walls are not always straight, so I never start at the wall and work out. I dry lay off that line to the wall and tape that random stepped, triangle shaped, "panel" together. I set it off to the side, and spread glue. Then I lift the panel carefully so it doesn't come apart, and set it in the glue, on my line. It goes fairly fast from there. Blue tape often to keep everything tight, and keep a rag with mineral spirits handy, to wipe glue, unless your using an acrylic adhesive, then a wet rag will do.

Out in a square room, it is a waste of time to dry lay. One tip. coming to doorjambs, don't try to use a full board across the undercut jambs. You'll never get it in. Use two boards and place the shorter side in first, so you can get the longer side in, without a bind. You will scoop glue sliding them in, so have a scrap or popcicle stick and your clean up rag handy.
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-08, 08:41 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
triangle shape?

Floorguy,
You said "tape that random stepped, triangle shaped, "panel" together." Since I haven't done any floors yet, I'm not getting this part about the "triangle shape"? If you're dry laying from your line to the wall wouldn't the shape be rectangular? thanks for your help....
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-08, 08:51 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 4,857
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
What? Your going to line all the ends up in a pattern, not random?? I wouldn' suggest that.

You start with different length boards off either the left or right wall. That is straight, your length along your line is strait, and your ends are staggered random, so as you work 2 or 3 feet toward the wall you popped your line off of, you get a stair step. So it is a triangle, Or you could build a pyrimid out in the center and work both left and right. Your ends need to be stair stepped no less then 6" from each other(more random the better for a random look.

I'm I typing a decent picture??
 
  #6  
Old 01-03-08, 06:32 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
dry lay

Thanks, I was thinking if I dry lay a section, of say 2 feet by 12 for example, how was it going to be a triangle? Of course I wouldn't be able to pick up and move the whole section.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: