Repair, resand, match to the rest of the floor?

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  #1  
Old 01-24-08, 11:15 PM
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Repair, resand, match to the rest of the floor?

I was originally planning on putting down travertine in my kitchen, but that might not work out now. There's hardwood there now, so I'm thinking of having it sanded instead. There are a few issues though.

-Some of the planks are damaged from water, they need to be removed and replaced.
-There use to be asphalt of vinyl tile over it, leaving behind adhesive.
-I had the rest of my condo hardwood resanded 2 years ago, including the dining room which is adjacent to the kitchen.

Will I be able to take one of the planks to Home Depot or somewhere and get the same wood? Is there a way for someone to look at it and say, hey that's so and so, right over here?

After I replace the damaged pieces and have the floor sanded, how hard will it be to match the stain to the rest of the place? Can I make it seamless, or do I have to have the whole places sanded again completely?
 
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Old 01-25-08, 09:07 AM
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Hmmm.. lots of questions...

Without seeing your damage - I'll throw this out there... In my experience - typical water damage to true hardwood floors is simply cupping of the flooring. If the wood is solid - sanding will take care of this, smoothing the floor to relatively level. If (if) the wood truly needs to be replaced - you can take a sample to a reputable hardwood dealer (avoid box stores) - to find out if you're dealing with red oak/white oak/etc. Once you've identified the species - you can replace the bad pieces (not easy, but do-able). When the kitchen is resanded - it will be up to the ability of the resurfacer to match the stain in the adjoining rooms - sometimes difficult, sometimes not (I had to match flooring last month and with about an hour of trial/error on stains, we came up with an acceptable finish). Probably won't get a perfect/seamless finish - but a pretty good approximation that won't be noticed by anyone but you (we are our own worst enemies in this situation).
 
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Old 01-25-08, 07:22 PM
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Thanks, I found someone who'll do it for a good price. He said he'll try to match the stain as close as possible. Most likely I'll be able to tell, but others won't unless they're looking for it.
 
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