Dog pads scuffing laminate, is AC3 that easy to screw up?

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  #1  
Old 01-26-08, 09:03 AM
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Question Dog pads scuffing laminate, is AC3 that easy to screw up?

I have recently laid laminate (finished in november) and one day noticed a scuff mark at a certain angle from the way the light hit it. It's from my 75lb greyhound that likes to play in the bedroom, to stop himself he extends his front paws and naturally slides (not far though) due to the laminate. These scuff marks are no more than 4" - 6" long but don't look like scratches (their paws are smooth due to daily walks), so not quite sure if in fact they are just micro scratches or if there is something I can do to remove whatever it is. Now this is starting to happen in alot of other areas.

Does anyone have any experience regarding this? I've never heard of dogs being able to scuff laminate this easily or is it possible that when this happens due to the friction the dogs pads are burning skin cells onto the laminate which is difficult to get off? I may try using a clay bar on it since that generally seems to get anything off. Manufacturer indicated this shouldn't be happening but since this is showing up all over I don't think I got a small batch that was bad.
 
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Old 01-26-08, 12:33 PM
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Sounds like possibly the wear layer is coming off already. Most manufacturers warranty this layer for at least a decade.

Try spraying some of that orange citrus type cleaner or a laminate cleaner (I think Bruce makes it and comes in a green bottle) on there and see if it helps.

AC3 rated flooring is commonly sold and is a residential grade floor. AC4 or 5 is the strongest, but mostly used in commercial applications.
 
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Old 01-27-08, 02:31 PM
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Yes, I have and tried the Bruce laminate/hardwood cleaner to no avail. Have also used a magic eraser and after getting down and looking real close to the affected area, it is in fact scratches. Hard to fathom that a dog's smooth pads can so easily scuff the protective layer (and no the floor nor his feet have grit on them when inside).

Manufacturer requested a sample of the floor so we will see how this plays out with claims, btw this is a liftetime warranty floor also.

Think I will order a few other samples of AC3 rated flooring and see how well it holds up to me trying to scuff the dog's pads on them for comparison sake.
 
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Old 01-27-08, 04:53 PM
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This is a case of being "oversold"

No laminate floor is scuff and scratch PROOF. Resistent yes, but proof, no.
 
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Old 02-18-08, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright View Post
This is a case of being "oversold"

No laminate floor is scuff and scratch PROOF. Resistent yes, but proof, no.
Yes, I understood that coming into this but am quite surprised that a dog's smooth pads can scratch laminate that easily. I have a friend with a mastiff that has laminate with no scuffs, granted he doesn't "play" as much as mine but does weigh double than my grey.
 
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Old 02-18-08, 07:27 AM
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I would almost bet the scratches are from the claws - not the pads.

My wife and I have a 75 pound standard poodle and we clip his 'nails' at least once a month - no problems so far on our floor.
 
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Old 02-22-08, 02:32 PM
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My cats retract their claws. Ha ha ha!
 
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Old 02-22-08, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by 12thirteen View Post
Yes, I understood that coming into this but am quite surprised that a dog's smooth pads can scratch laminate that easily. I have a friend with a mastiff that has laminate with no scuffs, granted he doesn't "play" as much as mine but does weigh double than my grey.
He's got claws doesn't he? There claw marks dude
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-08, 08:34 AM
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I have that exact problem

My dog's pads are also scratching my laminate floors. The scratches from her nails are different than the scratches from her paws. The paw scratches look like paw prints until you get up really close. The nail scratches just look like straight surface scratches. I called the company I purchased them from and they were no help at all! I have literally got down on my knees and scrubbed with a micro fiber cloth and the cleaning solution I purchased directly from the flooring company. It did nothing!!! My brand new floors that i spent quite a bit of money on plus installation cost look terrible when the light hits them in a certain way. I purchased commercial grade flooring with a high gloss finish. You would think they would not get scratched by a dog's paw! I have a ton of paw prints all over my floors and it makes the high gloss look very cloudy. I would love to know if you have found a solution. I've done quite a bit of research but haven't gotten any answers!
 
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Old 06-10-08, 10:43 AM
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Scratch and scuff resistance is not the same as scratchproof and scuffproof. AC ratings are 1 -5 with AC5 being the best. Glossy finishes will tend to show scratches and scuffs more than satin finishes.

Dog paws do not scratch laminate, but dog nails do. If they run and slide, the nails protrude and act as brakes to stop the skid. Some laminate manufacturers offer laminate touch up kits for their products. Even Alloc's 5-star warranty does not warranty against scratches due to misuse or abuse. Most manufacturers advise dog owners to keep nails trimmed and to use runners and rugs to protect the floor.
 
  #11  
Old 06-10-08, 03:00 PM
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If the paws don't scratch the floors, then how do you explain actual paw prints all over my floors that will not come off. They are in the shape of an actual dog paw print.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 03:22 PM
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The scuffing of the paws on the floor is a fact. You see it, others have reported the same thing. Even when their pads feel soft to us, apparently floors still show the affects.

In defence of twelvepole, it was stated "paws do not scratch laminate, but dog nails do". Scuffs and scratchs are different. I think you probably have scuffs. Heck, I can do that on my car with a clean terry towel if I rub right.

One reason why I'm not a fan of laminate or wood if there are pets and kids involved. I went hoarse yelling at my kid to stop running on the foyer laminate.

Sorry, no answer on how to conceal or eliminate them, maybe Carpets or one of the other Pro's wil weigh in.
 
  #13  
Old 06-10-08, 07:49 PM
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If using a treated mop or a cleaning product that leaves residues on the laminate, then footprints can be a problem. There have been many internet forum posts where residues have caused 'print problems' from both pet and human footprints.

Laminate should not be cleaned with products containing waxes or oils or cleaned with treated mops that leave residues. Scuffs and footprints on plastic laminate are often removed with ammonia. If more difficult to remove, then use baking soda and water paste. These solutions will not remove scratches.
 
  #14  
Old 07-03-08, 08:25 AM
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We have two greyhounds (and sometimes three when we are fostering). We have been thinking to get rid of the carpet and go with laminate flooring. I guess we should rule out the piano/glossy finish models no matter what they say about durability. I kind of had a feeling this would be the case. It seems perhaps going with a product that has some texture to it would help hide scuffs/scratches?
 
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Old 07-08-08, 10:22 AM
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Probably not. At certain angles and lighting, I'm sure you'll notice the scratches. If you are anticipating scratches on laminate wood floors, you probably should choose a different type of flooring if it's in your budget. Otherwise, expect to see the scratches. ...or trim the nails.
 
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