Laminate Flooring: Laying through doorways between rooms questions

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Old 02-02-08, 11:32 AM
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Laminate Flooring: Laying through doorways between rooms questions

Hi,
I have an installation of laminate flooring (click style) that I'm going to do. I understand that most or all of the instructions show that when you lay the stuff at and in a doorway (when laying the laminate into the next room), that they show to use one of the T-Strips to join level sections of flooring (in this case, laminate to laminate).

First of all, I have to say that in this instance I'm not truly aware of what the T-Strip is doing, other than merely joining two fields of the laminate flooring. If I knew more about the use of the T-Strip for my application, I might be able to make a better construction choice.

What I've been wondering relative to my above question is if you actually have to use such a strip. I think that flowing the floor seamlessly from one room to another might look better, but won't do it if there's some kind of real reason not to do it, such as aesthetics, properties of the laminate flooring or laying difficulty.

I want the transition to look as professional and as "normal' as possible, even if it means that my idea of using no strip is not the idea. I don't want it to look like a Moron did it because of some lame details that stick out like a sore thumb.

In this instance, since I don't know if it will make any difference, the area that I'll transition laminate to laminate will be in the "doorway" of a closet that will use bifold doors which will be installed later. The opening is approximately 5' or so wide. I want the closet to have a finished look, since it's big enough and I also have plenty of laminate. Would anything change if the dorway in question was a normal door and of typical smaller dimensions than the closet that I'll be doing?

I do know about undercutting the jams and have no trouble with that. In this case, instead of door jambs, I have some trim stips that I'd be undercutting to fit the laminate under. I just lived with a tile installation that I tore out to put this down where the people basically worked up to existing molding and fitted some tile to but up against it if it was convenient, and if not, they simply grouted the space to fill where tile should be and didn't cover the edge of the tile fields with molding..lol. Yes, it looked horrible.

Thanks for any help and clarification,

Danny
 

Last edited by gas_gunner; 02-02-08 at 11:45 AM. Reason: omitted details
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Old 02-04-08, 09:29 AM
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Welcome the DoItYourself.com forums

Not the pro around here, but the reason for the T-mold is that you need a 1/4 inch expansion gap unless you are installing over a huge area. So...when you install it, don't butt it up to the T-mold both ways. If the manufacturer's installation instructions calls for a T-mold in each doorway...I'd do so b/c it can void your warranty. Professionally done is doing it properly.
 
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Old 02-04-08, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by DIYaddict View Post
Welcome the DoItYourself.com forums

Not the pro around here, but the reason for the T-mold is that you need a 1/4 inch expansion gap unless you are installing over a huge area. So...when you install it, don't butt it up to the T-mold both ways. If the manufacturer's installation instructions calls for a T-mold in each doorway...I'd do so b/c it can void your warranty. Professionally done is doing it properly.
DIYaddict, I think yuo meant to say that you need a 1/4 inch expansion gap unless you are NOT installing over a huge area.

In other words gas_gunner, if this was going from one big room into another big room, it would be very important to have the T mold to allow the floors to expand and contract. The T mold would hide the space between the two sections of floor.

Since this isn't the case, and you are connecting a closet to the room, it really doens't matter and is a case of personal preference.

FWIW, I am in the middle of putting down laminate too, and I decided to put in the T mold. I didn't have to, but I used the house I grew up in as a guide, and it used a threshold in the closets, so that's what I used. Plus, the carpet that was there beforehand was very thick and there would have been a lot of space under the door if I hadn't put them in.
 
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Old 02-05-08, 04:22 PM
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Good choice to stay with what the manufacturer requires!!!

The reason for the "T" molding is the rooms need to float independently from one another, or it will separate the locking joint right at the door. Halls really do this.

Little closets you may get by with, but not anything over a 6x6 closet.
 
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