Need advice. Installing laminate flooring first time.

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  #1  
Old 03-01-08, 07:34 PM
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Need advice. Installing laminate flooring first time.

Greetings,
I will be installing laminate flooring for the first time. Its already a couple weeks now that I have bought the laminate. Some of my questions below:

What tools should I buy?
Which of these should I absolutely(minimally) have?
Links to reading material, photos, videos etc.

Thank you.

edit: Would just a jigsaw be sufficient? Can i cut along the length of the laminate?
 

Last edited by khurdp; 03-02-08 at 06:16 AM. Reason: Adding...
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  #2  
Old 03-02-08, 10:39 AM
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Recommended tools for laminate flooring installation

I installed Pergo laminate flooring about five years ago. I don’t know if you can still buy the glue-together kind, but that is what I installed at that time. Most of it now is the click-together kind, which is easier to install.

You should thoroughly read the manufacturer’s installation instructions, and then read them again to make sure you understand every step of the procedure. The tools needed are usually listed in the instructions. Since you are saving a lot of money by doing the work yourself, I recommend that you don’t try to cut corners by not having the proper tools to do the job. You will only cause yourself greater frustration, and may botch the job. If you don’t already own one, I highly recommend that you purchase a compound saw and a small workbench. I purchased a saw for $100 and a “work-mate” type bench for about $40. These are well worth it, as you will need to ensure that you make straight cuts. These are nearly impossible to do with a jigsaw. However, you will need the jigsaw and perhaps a hand saw for fine cuts. I also recommend that you have the following items on hand: a chalk line, a square, a pencil, a rubber mallet, a carpenter's hammer, pliers, sand paper, metal file, a box opener (for cutting the underlayment), masking tape or duct tape (for underlayment seams), plenty of spacers. If you are removing baseboard, you will need a pry bar. If you are saving the baseboard to reinstall later, you need to be careful when you remove them and make sure you remove existing nails from the backside of the baseboard to preserve the finish on the face.

I hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 03-02-08, 10:59 AM
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...just to add, if the flooring mfgr has an installation kit, Buy It. It usually comes with spacers, tapping block and a very much needed tool for installing the boards at the edges along the walls, 'Pull Bar'. These will help you out as well.
I used a table saw for my install.. mostly all right angles, but the jigsaw will come in handy if you need to cut curves, etal.
I recommend removing baseboards. Gives you more working room, to leave the required gap at the walls, which will then be covered by the install/reinstall of the baseboards.
 
  #4  
Old 03-02-08, 05:40 PM
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I can pretty much do it all with a table saw.
 
  #5  
Old 03-03-08, 08:22 AM
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table saw for ripping

Likely you are going to have to rip your first row of planks in order for the last row to be wide enough for install. See the instructions with the flooring. Your choices for this task is a table saw or a skill/jig saw. The table saw is much more accurate. I borrowed one from a friend, but if you choose to buy, you can get a pretty good one for $125-$150. Also search on the internet for "laminate floor installation" - you will get plenty of hits.
 
  #6  
Old 03-03-08, 08:27 AM
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for a day or two you might just rent a table saw and a compound miter from your local home improvement store too unless you think you'll use it down the road.
 
  #7  
Old 03-05-08, 07:39 AM
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Thanks for everybodys' replies.

Pardon my ignorance but how do I use a compound saw to cut along the length(the longest side) of the plank?

What do you think of this one? - http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...Name=WDVW&rd=1

Thank you.
 
  #8  
Old 03-05-08, 08:16 AM
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You can't ...as far as cutting the length. Others mentioned the table saw-that's for the length. The one you posted looks like a cheapy weepy You'll have to get the blade for it too. Anyway, if you like tools and don't already have a miter saw, and love working with tools, wood, etc...I think it would be a good investment to buy one. However, renting one sounds like a good option or ask your friends or neighbors if they have one.

Another option like you and others mentioned was the jig saw. Really tough to get a straight line but if you're patient and good with the tool it's "good enough" b/c that part would covered up by your base or quarter round. Check to see if you have any weird angles too b/c you'll need that jig to cut angles and/or weird pieces.

BTW: Welcome to the DoItYourself.com forums
 
  #9  
Old 03-05-08, 07:28 PM
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Thanks for the warm welcome DIYaddict.

Well, the laminate that I have brought is the click-together kind. I bought it from a wholesale dealer and it doesn't have any instructions. The most it has is the temperature it should be installed at.

First correct me if my understanding is wrong - these kind of floors are floating floors i.e. they are not attached/nail/screwed to the base floor but just stay in place by their shear weight and friction over a big area.

I was planning to install the laminate without removing the baseboards. I will keep a space of 0.5" from the baseboard and nail quarterrounds to hide the space.

[edit] I have attached the pictures now. Somehow i think the picture quality has deteroiated.[edit]
I was going to attach some pictures. I have spent two days preparing these. Could somebody tell me how to upload pictures or the moderators please let me for this posting upload those pictures. These are the areas where I don't understand what can be done since I will have to keep a distance of 0.5" but at the same time since they aren't straight surfaces how can I hide the gap with a quarterround. Also, you will see in the picture that there is a carpeted staircase that I don't plan on installing laminate on. What should I do where the laminate floor and carpeted stairs meet?

Also, i think i have used the right terms(moulding, baseboard) in the pictures but i could be wrong.

thank you





 

Last edited by khurdp; 03-06-08 at 07:26 AM.
  #10  
Old 03-06-08, 07:26 PM
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you can get an undercut jam saw to cut door jams and such
 
  #11  
Old 03-07-08, 11:57 AM
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well if i cut jams in the door molding or the other molding shown, there are going to be sections that can give me only 3/8". How can i keep a distance of 1/2"?

Any idea what do I do over the carpeted stairs?

thank you
 

Last edited by khurdp; 03-07-08 at 11:58 AM. Reason: missed a word
  #12  
Old 03-08-08, 11:17 AM
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Hello,
I bought a used craftsman 81/4" radial arm saw. Please email me a copy of the manual if you have one. The model is 113.234700.

For laminate flooring how many teeth blade should I use?
[edit] What size blade would fit this saw? Can I use a 71/4, 8 & 8/14" blade on it?

Thank you
 

Last edited by khurdp; 03-08-08 at 11:27 AM. Reason: added question.
  #13  
Old 03-09-08, 09:24 AM
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Yes... these are 'floating' floors. No glue. Click and go. I presume you're on a wood subfloor?? - and pretty flat??
.
You could use any blade 8-1/4 - 7-1/4 will fit..and that saw would be good for the short cuts. The more teeth, the finer the cut, so go w/40 teeth or better. 40 is fine.
.
You may have some problems fitting 1/4 round on some those areas around the casings (door trim) and moldings as depicted in the last pic.
.
Normally, the casings and baseboards are off the ground by about 3/8" - 1/2" to accomodate tucking the carpet in and under them. That may or may not be enough room to get your laminate under them, thats why removing the base, at least is easier for the install then under cut the jamb and trim.
It also looks like some of your casings are MDF vs Wood. If you remove those, be gentle..as the mdf can and probable split or break. Use a utility knife/Olfa blade to score the edges where caulked, before removing them.
With some of those angles and contours, it may be easier to remove..rather than undercut. For the stairs area, (pic 2) that is mounted to the ground/floor. best thing there is to leave your 3/8" and use your 1/4 round or 'shoe' or 'cove' base to cover the gap. As for the stairs..I presume its at a regular width.. (36" +/-)...walls on both sides?!?- Using laminate for the tread, bullnose and riser!?!? ....
 
  #14  
Old 03-10-08, 03:51 PM
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Thank you jatco for your reply.

This is a brand new townhome. 2 years coming june end. So,.... hopefully the wood subfloor is flat!!!. How do I test?

The laminate is 7mm and maybe 1mm of foam(wrong term i guess) so i guess the laminate might fit under door moulding/casing. If not, i will use a jamb saw/chisel it to fit. My problem/question is since it has this design to it which I have shown in cross-sectional pictures where someplaces the width is 3/8" and some 1/2", if I have to maintain a constance distance of 1/2" how could I do that? What is the trick professionals use?

I am surprised/worried not many people have and whoever has has not answered my questions satisfactorily - I hope my language is good enough, actually that is the reason why i am submitted pictures.

Also, what should i do if i have to keep the carpet on the stairs? can i hammer quarter round on the carpet or is there a neater way to cover the section where the carpeted stairs meet the laminate?

thank you.
 
  #15  
Old 03-10-08, 04:09 PM
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Hi,

I don't think it is your language that is a problem, you write very well. Most people come here with just a specific question, after they have researched their project.

Also,all of the responders are volunteers and many of the responders have jobs, so only devote a limited amount of time to answering questions.

Did you have installation instructions with this floor? Some of your questions may be answered there. Here, on our site, is a link that will give you much information about your laminate floor.http://www.doityourself.com/scat/laminate


Please return and start a new thread when you have a new question, instead of putting all your questions in one thread.
There is also a section for tools, if you have questions about your saw.

I hope this information is helpful to you. We do want to help you, but you must help yourself a little bit, too.
 
  #16  
Old 03-11-08, 05:53 AM
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I missed that part...

Sorry, I see in your previous post you said you had no instructions. I hope the link I provided was therefore, helpful.
 
  #17  
Old 03-11-08, 05:14 PM
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Connie I understand that anybody answering my questions are volunteering and in fact doing me a favor and don't get me wrong - I am grateful to them. I have also done my research - all information out there is the very same repeated information. I agree I started out with a too generic question but I was being very particular when I posted pictures.

English isn't my first language, to add to it flooring terms - I thought I am not expressing myself correctly enough to get answers.

What is frustrating is that a good number of people reading are professionals and should encounter my situation on a regular basis.

And, the reason I kept everything in one post was to be like a project activity journal which would be helpful to somebody else - was a good intention.

Anyway, I think I will now post on another thread what I plan on doing - only specifics that I have my doubts and have read otherwise and people can advice for or against my plan.

thank you
 
  #18  
Old 03-11-08, 05:24 PM
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Good job
 
  #19  
Old 07-24-08, 11:05 AM
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Question installing floating floor around shaped molding-how?

I have moldings like Khurdp (see photes)
I will not be removing my baseboard,because my home is 106 years old.
I realize I can use quarter round on the straight walls and thats fine.
I purchased a molding shaper....has small plastic pins that duplicate the shape.
Q- will the floating floor lift in the area? should I glue this small area down? or would it cause problems when the floor needs to move?
I can't not under cut at the door to slide flooring under door frame -it would ruin it and cause problems .
So ... heres hoping some one has solved this same type problem and can help me .

thanks!
 
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