Bruce Engineered over Vinyl?

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  #1  
Old 04-26-08, 04:26 PM
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Bruce Engineered over Vinyl?

I'm about a week away from installing Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood in hallway/kitchen. Current flooring is perimeter-glued vinyl sheet. The vinyl is tight in most places; where it had broken away (glue failure), I re-glued and stapled the edges.
Question: Should I take up all the old vinyl or run about 1000+ staples around the perimeter and some in the field to keep it steady under the new floor? Hate to do more work than needed but I do want to do it properly.

Any other advice on this type flooring would be appreciated. There is a full basement under the floor so it isn't over concrete etc...

Thanks for the advice.
Bob
 
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  #2  
Old 04-26-08, 09:23 PM
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You should be fine. I see no reason to remove the sheet vinyl for a floating or staple down floor over vinyl.
 
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Old 04-27-08, 11:42 AM
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Perry,
Thanks for the good news!
Another quick question: I'm planning on taking out old kitchen cabinets and install the new floating floor system about 6-12" inches under the fronts of the base cabinets (I'll use plywood and shims for the rest under the cabinets. Is this ok or does the floating floor have to be 1/2" from front of the base cabinets like it does around walls? I would think it is ok since the stove, dishwasher, and refrigerator all sit on the flooring and generally prevent it from moving also.
TIA,
Bob
 
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Old 04-27-08, 11:54 AM
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I would not put it under the cabinets. God forbid if you ever have to replace the floor.

Leave your required gap, and install a shoe molding.
 
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Old 04-27-08, 01:51 PM
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Mark,
For whatever reason, I never thought of the day that I might have/want to replace the flooring and then I'd have a real problem with the cabinets sitting on the flooring. Thanks for saving me from myself! I assume the dishwasher has enough adjustment (little screw legs) to gain that 1/2" to accomodate the difference in the flooring. I just wanted to avoid the situate some people have had who box in their dishwasher with flooring and can't get the old one out because the new floor is too high.
Bob
 
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Old 04-28-08, 04:27 PM
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Last question (at least until I get stuck!):
Instructions say to lay at right angle to floor joists. I'd prefer for aesthetic sake to lay parallel to them (front door to kitchen is a 36" wide corridor that I think would look funny with the boards laid parallel to the front door and down the hallway). Any real-world issues if I lay them parallel to the joists?
TIA,
Bob
 
  #7  
Old 04-28-08, 04:32 PM
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Depends on joists spacing and subfloor stiffness but you should be ok.

Is there a joist running the center of this hallway?

They just want to be sure the floor will not flex enough to seperate the planks.
 
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Old 04-28-08, 07:17 PM
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Hot,
I'll have to check it out tomorrow about the joist; I don't see any noticeable dips/valleys/ridges in the floor that's about 15 years old. I think it would sag by now if it were going to do so. I'll run a mason's string across the floor and see if there's any gaps between joists.
Bob
 
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Old 04-29-08, 06:13 PM
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Hot,
There is a joist that runs fairly close to the center of the hallway. What is the significance of this?
Bob
 
  #10  
Old 04-29-08, 06:33 PM
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You should be fine. Any joist adds strength to the subfloor and minimizing flex. If you can't flex the floor now when walking on it, you will be fine. Proceed.
 
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