Laminate in Doorways - Need help!

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  #1  
Old 06-23-08, 07:50 AM
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Laminate in Doorways - Need help!

Hi - First time post. This a great website!

Problem:
I installed Pergo in my upstair hall. However, I do not know what to do with the doors. I can't seem to get the piece in becuase it needs to be angled. I also tried 2 pieces and could not get that to work either.

I have the 4 way t-molds but need the final piece of laminate before I install it.

Can someone take a look at these pics and help me with some suggestions?

Thanks!



 
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  #2  
Old 06-23-08, 08:39 AM
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Snap one piece into place and slide it under the jamb, go as far as you can. Cut the other piece to fit, snap it in and slide it under the other jamb, just enough to cover any opening. Now slide the other piece back until they meet.
 
  #3  
Old 06-23-08, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill62 View Post
Snap one piece into place and slide it under the jamb, go as far as you can. Cut the other piece to fit, snap it in and slide it under the other jamb, just enough to cover any opening. Now slide the other piece back until they meet.
Thanks but I think this approach will leave gaps in the front. There would be no room to move the first piece because the gap goes all the way to the back (in front - if you look closely at pic) so it would need to sit flush. I'm at a complete loss.

There has to be some tricky way to do this.
 
  #4  
Old 06-23-08, 03:42 PM
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If you notch the piece as needed to go around the framing behind the door jamb and trim this method will work. It may take some playing around with but I'm sure you can get it to work.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 05:20 PM
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Your first row should have been started from the center of one of the doorways and ripped to fit along the length of the wall. Then you would only be having fun with one doorway instead of two.

First, make sure the door frames are undercut as far back as you can possibly get on both sides. You will then have to cut two pieces (plan for a seam in the middle of the door possible offset toward the hinge side), the cuts will need to follow the profile of the undercut of the door and arc out to meet the first row past and underneath the shoe molding. Insert one half (latch side) into the first row and slide it back under the door frame as far as it can go. For the smaller portion that will go under the hinge side, take a utility knife and shave off the small locking ridge on the tongue side so that it can slide in straight instead of tilting at an angle. Apply some laminate glue to the piece before putting them together. Slide everything back until it is centered and positioned correctly in the opening.

You may find it easier to remove the base and shoe molding during the process to give you more working room.
 
  #6  
Old 06-23-08, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by czizzi View Post
Your first row should have been started from the center of one of the doorways and ripped to fit along the length of the wall. Then you would only be having fun with one doorway instead of two.

First, make sure the door frames are undercut as far back as you can possibly get on both sides. You will then have to cut two pieces (plan for a seam in the middle of the door possible offset toward the hinge side), the cuts will need to follow the profile of the undercut of the door and arc out to meet the first row past and underneath the shoe molding. Insert one half (latch side) into the first row and slide it back under the door frame as far as it can go. For the smaller portion that will go under the hinge side, take a utility knife and shave off the small locking ridge on the tongue side so that it can slide in straight instead of tilting at an angle. Apply some laminate glue to the piece before putting them together. Slide everything back until it is centered and positioned correctly in the opening.

You may find it easier to remove the base and shoe molding during the process to give you more working room.
Thanks for the feedback. I'm thinking of just pulling up the whole floor and placing the doorway boards in first ( I think is what you were referring to) and make the first row match it.

Could you explain again how it should have been done? And will there be more cutting if I do this or can I probably use all or most of the existing boards?

Also, the door jam at the bathroom is much lower than the laminate and I'm not sure what to do there. Any help?

Thanks a lot for taking the time to help. I'm a little upset about it but still have a nice sense of accomplishment with what I have done.
 
  #7  
Old 06-24-08, 12:26 AM
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use a piece of cardboard as a template to try to get a good fit them transfer that onto the pieces...use an undercut saw and try to get the trim and casing trimmed up a bit when you relay.
 
  #8  
Old 06-24-08, 06:45 AM
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So, if I start with a blank slate again by lifting up everything - I am going to cut boards to fit in the doorways on the first row side as the first board - leaving some space for the first row. I don't think I will need to undercut because that board does not need to be lifted up (I'm thinking I can angle it around the door jambs to fit on both sides). Then start my first row and when I come to the door, lift the lip to fit the doorboard as I should be able to shift everything to fit.

Then, I have the bathroom door (you can see this on right side from the hallway picture) and I will do the same with that door. The only problem is the door frame is lower than the laminate. I am assuming I need to cut it or jig a piece to fit in.

After that, everything else should lay into place as it is now.

Maybe I'm in too deep.
 
  #9  
Old 06-24-08, 10:02 AM
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I wouldn't start all over again. That would be a lot of extra work. Do it just like czizzi explained. In the end, it will look perfect.
 
  #10  
Old 06-24-08, 05:18 PM
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I would not take up the whole floor. I think this can be dealt with.

I am not a pro flooring guy, so maybe you should call Pergo or whoever, for some tech help. It occurs to me one way to deal with this is to cut off the tongue of the piece that needs to fit in the jamb, even if this means gluing it down, or using some face nailed finish nails.
 
  #11  
Old 06-24-08, 07:42 PM
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Thanks Everyone. I decided to just pull it all up and start at the doors. So far so good. Bedroom 1 and Bathroom doors are complete. I am finding out that most of the boards can be reused.

The biggest trouble I am having is cutting the door jams. I have a door jam saw and recipricating saw but it still sucks. It's a pain but this is the key for the cleanest looking install.

I'll post some pictures when I'm done.

Looks like my body will be hurting for at least a few more days -
 
  #12  
Old 06-25-08, 02:06 PM
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The way I solved this problem with my floor was to lift the carpet and slide a board (cut to width) under the jamb from the room side. I tapped it until it locked with the boards in the hallway. It worked well and looks fine.
 
  #13  
Old 06-25-08, 05:17 PM
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Silly observation, but in your pictures, I do not see any underlayment. You did use an underlayment, didn't you?

Anyway, to accurately undercut a doorway with a hand offset undercut jamb saw, take a piece of scrap underlayment and scrap laminate and place it against the door jamb. This will give you the proper thickness for the undercut. Turn the scrap piece of laminate upside down and lay the undercut saw on top of it and and saw against the door using the scrap pieces as a guide to get a straight and accurate cut. You can use the same procedures to undercut the door casing.

When you get to the final bathroom opening. Measure as best you can the final piece and cut it to size. Slide it under the door before you put the final full roll into place. Then back the door threshold piece onto the main floor as the final click.
 
  #14  
Old 06-26-08, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by czizzi View Post
Silly observation, but in your pictures, I do not see any underlayment. You did use an underlayment, didn't you?
Thanks - this style of pergo has an attached underlayment.
 
  #15  
Old 06-30-08, 05:53 PM
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When working into a doorway like that, you cut the locking tab off the plank, use PVA glue and flat slide it right in place and use blue painters tape to hold it together. Your not going to rotate it in and get it under the door casings. Sometimes you have to use two planks and have an endjoint in the doorway.
 
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