Removing glue from underneath laminate on stairs

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Old 07-30-08, 05:30 AM
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Removing glue from underneath laminate on stairs

Iím a first time ďdo it yourselferĒ in regards to installing hardwood flooring. Iím in the process of removing old laminate flooring and carpet from the area I am improving. Hereís my problem: Old laminate flooring currently covers a stairwell and Iím in the process of removing it. The current flooring only covers the step and not the face of the stair. Iím able to remove the rounded edge and the laminate panel with a crowbar and a hammer pretty efficiently. The laminate on the stairs were glued down to the plywood underneath. Once I remove everything, the glue remains. Iím not sure what kind of adhesive it is. It was laid with a trowel and is black in color. I used a Dremmel tool with a stone bit to remove half of the glue on one stair, but ended up breaking three bits in the process. There has to be a better way. Should I not even bother removing the glue? Is there a certain adhesive remover that is recommended? When I put my new flooring down, is the glue down method recommended for stairs or should I consider something else? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by markm4444 View Post
Iím a first time ďdo it yourselferĒ in regards to installing hardwood flooring. Iím in the process of removing old laminate flooring and carpet from the area I am improving. Hereís my problem: Old laminate flooring currently covers a stairwell and Iím in the process of removing it. The current flooring only covers the step and not the face of the stair. Iím able to remove the rounded edge and the laminate panel with a crowbar and a hammer pretty efficiently. The laminate on the stairs were glued down to the plywood underneath. Once I remove everything, the glue remains. Iím not sure what kind of adhesive it is. It was laid with a trowel and is black in color. I used a Dremmel tool with a stone bit to remove half of the glue on one stair, but ended up breaking three bits in the process. There has to be a better way. Should I not even bother removing the glue? Is there a certain adhesive remover that is recommended? When I put my new flooring down, is the glue down method recommended for stairs or should I consider something else? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Scraping *using a good quality scraper that you have sharpened the blade with a fine file, will SOMETIMES work, but this method is extremely labor intensive. I assume that you are just talking about the area where you will be laying for stair treads????

There is a product that I have had success with: You can find it here -
http://www.savogran.com/Retail_Produ..._products.html

It is enviromentally safe and there are no harsh chemicals (big plus)!

Sanding the glue off with a floor "edger" and 16 or 24 grit is also an option, but there is a trick/nack to using this machine and you will go through MANY sanding discs, as the glue heats up under the rotorary action of the sander. Goggles are REQUIRED, as is a RESPIRATOR.

I would recommend using actuall STAIR TREADS that have a nosing on them, you could measure the depth to the front of the riser, and then add 1-1/4" for an overhang. Then measure the length needed and go to your local lumber yard with these measurments. They will get you the closest fit and then you will probally just have to cut the new treads to the actuall length. Installing them will require gluing down with a construction adhesive (comes in small and large caulking style tubes) called PL-200 or PL-400. Finish nailing them into place if they are prefinished, or screwing and bunging the counter sunk screw holes with wood bungs (also available at your lumber yard) if they are unfinished. Obviously prefinished is the way to go. Try one out without removing the existing glue, if ROCKS BACK and FORTH - you will have to remove the existing glue... If not, you are good to go, just use plenty of PL-200 or PL-400 and adequately secure them!

Good Luck,

Greg (Retired Floor installer/refinisher)
Maine
 
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