Laminate or fix the hardwood flooring?

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Old 08-05-08, 01:12 PM
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Laminate or fix the hardwood flooring?

I've recently removed a hard sheet of Vinyl covering a ~200 sqft. square room. After removing the Vinyl flooring, there are several 1-2sqft. areas where i am not able to completely remove the adhesive used to glue the Vinyl to the hardwood. I'm trying to decide whether it's worth it to simply cover the existing hardwood with laminate flooring or try to remove the remnants of the Vinyl and attempt to re-do the exiting hardwood floor, any advice?

I'd also like to know if i could possibly sand the spots off without damaging the existing hardwood floors, or is there a better way?
 
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Old 08-07-08, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by rock731 View Post
I've recently removed a hard sheet of Vinyl covering a ~200 sqft. square room. After removing the Vinyl flooring, there are several 1-2sqft. areas where i am not able to completely remove the adhesive used to glue the Vinyl to the hardwood. I'm trying to decide whether it's worth it to simply cover the existing hardwood with laminate flooring or try to remove the remnants of the Vinyl and attempt to re-do the exiting hardwood floor, any advice?

I'd also like to know if i could possibly sand the spots off without damaging the existing hardwood floors, or is there a better way?
What type of hardwood floor is it? Can you tell if it is solid 3/4" hardwood or not? Prior to moving forward you need to know how much "wear thickness" is remaining on the existing hardwood floor. Wear thickness is the thickness of the top part of the groove on the floor. Usually you can check this by removing a flooring vent, or if you see nail head exposed, or simply by looking at the floor if there is any gaps you may be able to tell.

You see, unless you know why the floor was covered in the first place - you just dont know the integrity of the flooring and whether or not it will be ABLE to be sanded down. You can carefully "spot sand" areas, but you will have to play with matching the natural "Patina" (Hardwood floor will age and with age comes a natural color it gathers). If you do stain an area, you then will need to protect the stained areas with a polyurethane. To do that you need to know if there is wax on the existing floor, or if it is a water based urethane or oil based urethane.

You may be best suited to have a hardwood refinishing company (get 3-4 estimates) come in and give you a free analysis and estimate. You can then chose to perform the repairs yourself or analyze your time it will take against the amount of money it will take to have PRO come in and do it right the first time around. I am not knocking or telling you that you do not have the expertise to do this task, it is just that without seeing it - there may be some unknowns that can be identified by having a professional/respectible Hardwood Refinisher come in and point things out to you. You can then make a decision (most reputable refinishers will give you a FREE estimate depending on how far away you are from them).

Here is a link you can use to help in removing adhesive...

http://www.savogran.com/Retail_Produ..._products.html

This is how you determine what type of finish you have on your existing floor:

If the floor was installed, or last serviced, before the mid '60s, you should assume the finish used was varnish or shellac. To determine this, scratch the surface with a coin or other sharp object in a corner or other inconspicuous space. If the finish flakes, it is probably shellac or varnish. Shellac and varnish are rarely used anymore and require full sanding to remove before application of a surface finish or wax finish.

Next, check the floor for wax finish. In an inconspicuous area, corner or behind a door, apply two (2) drops of water. If, within ten minutes, white spots appear under the drops of water, the floor has a wax finish. To remove the white spots, gently rub the spots with #000 steel wool dampened with wax. If the finish does not flake from scratching with a coin and white spots do not appear from the drops of water, the floor has a surface finish like Waterbase Urethane or Oil Based Urethane. To determine if which one you have, perform the following test:

If your floor finish has an amber tone, it is oil-based; if the finish is water-clear, it is water-based poly.

Hope this helps...

Greg (Retired floor installer/refinisher - Company Owner)
Maine
 
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