Engineered Flooring Help

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  #1  
Old 10-02-08, 01:43 PM
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Engineered Flooring Help

Hello All,

I am planning to install engineered flooring in a new home. The 2 hallways each have two 45 degree angles. That would suggest cutting the ends off the flooring at the angle. That will eliminate the toungue and groove on the ends of the boards. I talked to a guy and he suggested a biscuit cutter and biscuits between the ends of the boards.

What is the best way to deal with this so the boards are locked together on the ends???

Thanks in advance.
Nala
 
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  #2  
Old 10-02-08, 04:07 PM
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herringbone pattern where they meet. But that will make that corner the starting point for the entire area.

Or don't flip the wood at all. Leave it all going the same direction. This is a matter of personal taste.
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-08, 06:02 PM
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Help w/Engineered Flooring

Hi Akron,

I guess my original post wasn't very clear. My question is how to best replace the tongue and groove component of the engineered flooring when the ends have to be cut to a 45 degree angle??

The hallway has two 45 degree angles rather than a single 90 degree turn. If I trim the ends of the flooring boards to 45 degrees that will eliminate the tongue and groove component I am concerned that will make the flooring susceptible to more flexing at each 45 degree joint.

A biscut cutter was suggested but I would like to know if anyone has experience with this situation and what they did to overcome it..

Thanks,
Nala
 
  #4  
Old 10-02-08, 07:02 PM
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Oh. i misunderstood what you were looking for. I have no experience routing new tongue and grooves on boards.

Are you gluing this in, floating, stapling?
 
  #5  
Old 10-02-08, 10:28 PM
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biscuits

I've spoken to many woodworkers who have used a router with a slot-cutting bit to cut grooves for biscuits, but I would strongly advise against it. First of all, it is difficult to consistently insert a slot-cutting bit on a router into the edge of the stock perfectly perpendicular to the edge of the material. Additionally, I'm of the opinion that this is a rather dangerous procedure with a router.
 
  #6  
Old 10-03-08, 07:41 AM
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Help w/Engineered Flooring

Hi Akron & SeanJohn,

I am planning to use the Grex 23 guage pinner (Nailer) to fastend the engineered floor to the subfloor.

SeanJohn, Thanks for the advice on the biscut cutter for routers. I researched that a little and a plate joiner seems to the best method of cutting the grooves for biscuts, but that is all it does. So, that's probably why people go with the router accessory. I don't know yet if a plate joiner will work on material that is about 3/8 to 1/2 inch thick.

Regards,
Nala
 
  #7  
Old 10-04-08, 12:45 AM
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A 23 gauge pin nailer will not hold flooring down. The flooring manufacturers instructions usually specify the correct fastening procedure. If it's a stapler try your local rental shops.
 
  #8  
Old 10-04-08, 10:02 AM
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Help w/Engineered Flooring

Jan2,

Thank you for your timely input. I would have had a disaster on my hands. After I re-read the how-to on installation it is obvious that it calls for staples not pins. I guess that's the beauty of on-line forums.

Thanks again,
Nala
 
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