Solid Hardwood over Old Subfloor Prep


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Old 10-15-08, 07:05 PM
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Solid Hardwood over Old Subfloor Prep

Lookiing for the correct way to address this.

Situation: original section of house built in 1948. Half inch T&G white pine floors nailed directly to joists, no subflooring, no vapor barrier. Basement below with joists accessible. Would like to install new solid hardwood over old pine flooring.

Questions:

1. What subfloor prep is appropriate? Everything from "just nail it over the old floor" to "vapor barrier, 3/4 plywood, then install new solid" has been suggested.
2. How thick should be total subfloor be in order to install new hardwood parallel with joists, or is that just a bad idea?
2. Given that basement with no climate control is below, should I be considering engineered instead of solid? Solid is preferred though.

Thanks in advance!
 
  #2  
Old 10-16-08, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by OneBowl
Lookiing for the correct way to address this.

Situation: original section of house built in 1948. Half inch T&G white pine floors nailed directly to joists, no subflooring, no vapor barrier. Basement below with joists accessible. Would like to install new solid hardwood over old pine flooring.

Questions:

1. What subfloor prep is appropriate? Everything from "just nail it over the old floor" to "vapor barrier, 3/4 plywood, then install new solid" has been suggested.
2. How thick should be total subfloor be in order to install new hardwood parallel with joists, or is that just a bad idea?
2. Given that basement with no climate control is below, should I be considering engineered instead of solid? Solid is preferred though.

Thanks in advance!

1.) If you want the flooring to run the same direction as the existing, you will need a layer of " plywood. You can go right over the existing, if you run it the opposite direction or at a 45 angle to the existing pine. Use an asphalt impregnated felt under the new flooring.

2.) See #1 above.

3.) It may be a good idea, as basements that are not controlled, are known to have high humidity levels. This can cause your new floor to cup, as the bottom of the boards will gain moisture and swell, and the top of the boards be lower in moisture content and not swell.
 
 

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