Sanding Pine Flooring

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  #1  
Old 11-17-08, 06:41 PM
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Sanding Pine Flooring

My home is 108 years old. If I was a betting man, I would say that this is still the original Pine Wood flooring in the house. In one of the rooms the floor was painted, over and over and over again. I went to the Depot and picked up a spray to see what I could do to the floor. My success rate was spotty at best. So I am thinking about renting a sander and going to task. I want to restore the floor like the rest of the house which is in it's natural state.

1) Any suggestions for sanding this floor as I believe Pine to be one of the softest woods there is.

2) Any suggestions as to the appropriate way to stain this floor afterwards? I am very concerned as to the age of the wood and do not want to destroy it at all.

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 11-18-08, 03:01 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

please explain
"I went to the Depot and picked up a spray to see what I could do to the floor" ??


IMO would be best to start with a paint stripper/remover. The more you can remove before sanding the better.

The odds are that it's yellow pine which is a little tougher than white pine but sanding can still be tricky. A drum sander cuts the bet but it's easy for a novice to let it get out of control. A buffer/circular sander should give you more control.

You will need to clean the floor up firs before you can decide what needs to be done to make it match the rest of the floors.
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-08, 08:34 PM
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I used a liquid type remover the first time and then a Gel like substance. Both instructions told me to let it sit on the paint and then scrape it up, get it up with a sponge, etc....

I took off as much as I can and it doesn't seem to work on the rest of the paint. So there are spots that came clean and other spots where the paint is just not coming off. Looks pretty bad.

So you are suggesting a buffer/circular sander?

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 11-24-08, 03:20 AM
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Yes, sanding would be the next step.
 
  #5  
Old 11-26-08, 06:14 AM
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Location: Austin, TX
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I suggest a multi-head orbital sander, like a U-sander, Superbee, or Trio. Hard to mess up with these less aggressive sanders. Start with 80 grit and see what it does. If it is not cutting it, switch down to 60 grit. Once sanded, with 80 grit, go up in grit to 100 grit, or 60-80-100. Your final sand will be with 100 grit. You may need to hand sand with the grain, to blend. Vacuum and tack the floor several times, before you use your seal coat. Staining pine, is not the best idea for a novice. It comes out blotchy, unless you know exactly what your doing.

A buffer is going to leave circular scratches that can be a nightmare to remove.
 
  #6  
Old 11-26-08, 06:14 AM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,074
I suggest a multi-head orbital sander, like a U-sander, Superbee, or Trio. Hard to mess up with these less aggressive sanders. Start with 80 grit and see what it does. If it is not cutting it, switch down to 60 grit. Once sanded, with 80 grit, go up in grit to 100 grit, or 60-80-100. Your final sand will be with 100 grit. You may need to hand sand with the grain, to blend. Vacuum and tack the floor several times, before you use your seal coat. Staining pine, is not the best idea for a novice. It comes out blotchy, unless you know exactly what your doing.

A buffer is going to leave circular scratches that can be a nightmare to remove.
 
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