3/4 Hardwood Installation, ???s

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  #1  
Old 12-14-08, 09:39 AM
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Question 3/4 Hardwood Installation, ???s

I'm going to be installing Bruce 3/4 from HD.
House built approx. 1889, floor is for the kitchen, formally dining room. Rabble Stone stacked foundation on shale/hardpan, 36wx26d, main house,with a 16x16, 1906addition, with slightly better stone foundation, mortar!! This back section gets some water in the spring with snow melt and/or heavy downpours, the water goes just as quick as it comes. I would consider it a damp basement
Currently there is no heat in the basement, but should be next winter.
The floor joists are 2 1/2x10, with orig. 1" t&g flooring,then 3/4 t&g plywood as a new subfloor, installed 2 1/2 yrs ago.
Should I use red rosin or roofing felt?
Would a dehumidifier in the basement help?
The temp in the room where I'm acclimating is mid 60s, is this OK?
Don
 
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Old 12-15-08, 12:36 PM
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Sounds like a dehumidifier or two in the basement might be needed.
 
  #3  
Old 12-15-08, 12:52 PM
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I'm leaving this stuff in the house for 4 days, boxes open, box ends opened too, should this be long enough?
Don
 
  #4  
Old 12-15-08, 10:03 PM
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"This back section gets some water in the spring with snow melt and/or heavy downpours, the water goes just as quick as it comes. I would consider it a damp basement
Currently there is no heat in the basement, but should be next winter."

Install dehumidfiers to maintain humidity at 35-55%. Purchase a hygrometer to register humidity levels (sold where thermometers are sold). Fans will improve air circulations.

Make sure that gutters are clear and carry run off away from structure. Make sure soil slopes away from structure to direct runoff away from foundation.

If basement has earthen floor, then run 8 mil minimum polyvinylchoride (plastic) vapor retarder (better recommended), overlapped and run up walls and taped and silicone to walls.
 
  #5  
Old 12-17-08, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Dmystix View Post
I'm leaving this stuff in the house for 4 days, boxes open, box ends opened too, should this be long enough?
Don


What is your basis for 4 days of acclimation?


Proper acclimation is not done with a time limit!

Proper acclimation takes a little knowledge of average humidity levels and average wood moisture content for your region, and the use of a pin type wood moisture meter, along with a thermo-hygrometer.
 
  #6  
Old 12-20-08, 02:51 PM
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Don't Worry About Acclimation

I've never understood acclimation. The idea seems to be that the wood will get to a point where it is stable. A corollary goes that you get the lumber as dry as possible and then it is good-to-go for whatever you are doing because it is now all dried out and seasoned so it remains unchanged thereafter.

The fact is that wood takes on an amount of moisture in relation to the amount of humidity. Here in the Northeast, where you have lots of sticky humidity in the Summer, wood swells. In the Winter, where the outside air is cold and you heat it up inside, the inside humidity is near zero. Wood shrinks. This happens no matter how long the wood has been in place. In our 1930 house, cracks open in the oak floor in the Winter big-time, and they all close in the Summer. Ditto with cabinet doors, etc.

The west coast is a big area for woodworkers, and the humidity there is always pretty low. There are also situations these days where the wood will always be in the same controlled environment. Here, once your wood acclimates, I suppose it will always be pretty stable. For your 1889 house, I suspect you will see the wood opening up and closing up no matter how long you acclimate it.

Finally, the idea goes that if the wood is not properly acclimated, it will "move" (expand so it pops up) and you have to be careful leaving expansion gaps, etc. Have you ever tried to remove a piece of flooring you put down with a nail gun? I don't know how anybody could say that wood does much moving after it is installed. I think you might run into a problem if you were putting in a giant floor for a school gym, but I don't think you will ever see significant movement/expansion in a residential installation.
 
  #7  
Old 12-21-08, 09:38 PM
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a 3% gain or loss of moisture content, in a red oak floor, equates to a 1.3" swell or shrink, over only 10 feet of flooring.
 

Last edited by Carpets Done Wright; 12-28-08 at 09:29 AM.
  #8  
Old 12-27-08, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright View Post
a 3% gain or loss of moisture content, in a red oak floor, equates to a 1.3" swell or shrink, over only 10 feet of flooring.
C'mon now. 1.3" over 10'? Where did you read this? Wouldn't you have to leave a 1" gap around the perimeter on a 10'x10' room to allow for that kind of swelling?
 

Last edited by Carpets Done Wright; 12-28-08 at 09:30 AM.
  #9  
Old 12-28-08, 12:50 AM
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Sorry, I ride to the defense of Carpets Done Wright. He is an inhouse flooring expert. If you know nothing about moisture issues in subfloor acclimation and flooring and the importance of of these differences, then you need to do some research with experts, hardwood flooring associations, etc.

Sorry, but Carpets Done Wright, is not just a carpet guy. He installs all kinds of floor coverings and is certified by all. He is highly respected here and many websites for as long as I have been on this website. He is absolutely professional year round and 24/7 and certified. Pay attention to what Carpets Done Wright says and your moisture meter readings.

Bruce typically supplies installation info re: subfloor prep, vapor retarder, moisture reading info, acclimation and mosture differences, as well as vapor retarder info, etc. If in doubt of Carpets Done Wright and his fatherly advice on this website, contact Bruce.

And, Killian, butt out and get over yourself unless you work for the National Hardwood Flooring Association and they came up with new rules since I went to bed last night. Don't ever challenge Carpets Done Wright on this website as long as it is under my watch. Carpets Done Wright has been my leader and teacher, despite my indpendent research as a flooring retailer. He has always been my Godfather. Now, old an retired, Carpets Done Wright has done more than anyone to inspire and spread the word of proper flooring installation. Carpets Done Wright will tell you that the National Hardwood Flooring Association did not come up with new rules while we were sleeping last night. If you don't know anything about % of wood expansion and need for expansion gaps, butt out.
 
  #10  
Old 12-28-08, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Killian View Post
C'mon now. 1.3" over 10'? Where did you read this? Wouldn't you have to leave a 1" gap around the perimeter on a 10'x10' room to allow for that kind of swelling?

The shrink & swell coefficient for the species Red Oak, is .00369

Using the S&S coefficient, you can calculate how much each board will swell given a gain or loss of moisture content.

That is how I can figure pretty exactly what MC% the wood flooring was installed at. I can even use that to calculate what the MC of the wood was on the moment it got milled into a flooring board.
 
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