laminate flooring advice for a newbie

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  #1  
Old 12-30-08, 12:07 PM
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Post laminate flooring advice for a newbie

I'm preparing to replace the rugs in my 1 bedroom apartment and put in laminate flooring. I measured that I'll need a little under 500 sq feet.

My first thought was to look under the rugs and see if I already had wood flooring that can be repaired. Here is what I saw:


I am guessing that it can't be repaired within my budget ($1k).

I am thinking of buying this one:
Lumber Liquidators: 8MM Royal Mahogany Laminate

I'm not sure if I can find something cheaper in that color?

So what do I need to keep in mind when installing laminate flooring? I've never done this before but I am getting help from a friend who has done it once before.
 
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Old 01-02-09, 01:38 PM
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I guess my post is too broad. Here are some specific questions.

1. Do I remove the wood boards under the carpets? I guess they were put there to level out the carpeting?

2. I need to leave 10 mm of spacing around the installation to allow for movement?

3. I don't need underlayment because this laminate brings its own right?
 
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Old 01-02-09, 06:59 PM
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1) Yes, remove the wood. Your subfloor needs to be fairly flat before you lay down the laminate. The instructions will give you specifics.

2) Somewhere between 1/4" and 1/2 " (7mm - 13mm), again, instructions will give you specifics.

3) Correct. Do not add additional underlayment.

Good luck

Jeff
 
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Old 01-02-09, 07:04 PM
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hold up a minute.

Some laminates come with a attach padding underlayment, but not a moisture barrier. You need a moisture barrier too, which is not attached. Just simple 6 mil poly or 15 roofing felt will work.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 11:05 AM
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Thank you both for your replies. I'm sorry that I have more questions even though you mentioned that a lot of my questions will be answered on the instructions after I buy the laminate flooring.

In reply to Praxius 1)

Where those boards under my carpet placed there because the floor sloped in that area or is that standard for carpet installation?? Does it even matter if any part of my floor slopes a little as far as laminate is concered?


New questions:
I just read the following webpage about underlayment:
Articles | Flooring Underlayment - Types and Uses - by FastFloors.com

HotinOKC mentioned that I should get a moisture barrier. However, from what I read it seems that is only needed when the subfloor is concrete. My subfloor is wood, so I don't need that?

That website also recommends "Floor Muffler Brand Underlayment." Which, correct me if I am wrong, is the type of underlay that comes preinstalled onto the laminate boards I linked on my original post.

Secondly, the website recommends cork underlayment. Which I agree sounds nice, but I am not planning to live in my small apartment for that long. And since I am on the bottom floor, I don't really need that much sound proofing. Finally, that's an extra $500 I don't want to spend unless it's a huge difference.

But going back to the issue about my floors possibly sloping. Can I use cork underlayment in some areas and not others in orders to raise the floor or are there better products for that. It's a tough question because I really won't know if my floor needs to be raised or if it's sloped until I start preparing the sub floor.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 03:10 PM
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Of course they are going to recommend their underlayment. If your laminate comes with it already attached, then you don't need it.

In regards to the moisture barrier:

There are moisture tests that should be done in order to verify regardless if it's on slab or wood subfloor. It's always a safe practice to install it, and it's not that expensive.

For the low spots:

I wouldn't use cork as filler as this "may" add to much cushion to your floor which could cause to much flex. You can fill the low spots with SLC (self leveling compound) or depending on how low, roof shingles.
 
  #7  
Old 01-07-09, 02:14 PM
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I bought some of the Cherry Nirvana Laminate from lumber liquidators with the underlayment attached. They told me that its not recommended to put down an additional layer of underlayment with this flooring. They did say however, that some people do anyways.
 
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