Fixing voids and soft spots

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-09-09, 04:45 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 108
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Fixing voids and soft spots

I installed a new hardwood floor at my place recently. It's a floating engineered wood floor over concrete slab. I also used a sound+moisture barrier between the wood and the concrete.

I realize the concrete subfloor should be pretty flat in order to prevent voids, soft spots, or squeaking. But being an amateur, I couldn't really tell that the floor was uneven before I started -- I tried to measure the flatness to spec, but it seemed pretty flat to me at the time.

I guess I must have missed a few spots, but right now there are a few spots that feel "soft". It's not too bad, but I'd definitely prefer if it felt more solid, especially since the most severe spot was in a very high traffic area.

Is there a simple way to fix this, without taking out the floor? I don't really have the budget to get it fixed professionally either...

I found that for glue-down engineered floors, there is a product called DriTac -- a kit that lets you drill a hole into the wood and fill it with some adhesive using a syringe. Would something like this work for my floating floor?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-10-09, 12:59 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Saint George, Utah
Posts: 158
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That product is used for gluedown wood, not floating floors. The only way to fix your issue is to take the floor up and flatten the subfloor.
 
  #3  
Old 03-31-09, 06:26 PM
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Im having the same problem with my flooring. a few soft spots in high traffic areas. There must be some way to improve the low spot without taking up the whole floor.

Ive considered using expanding foam but worried it might actually lift up the floor instead of expanding across the floor. Ive considered drilling a small hole and inserting dry sand to fill the low spot. My concerns is that it would be above the vapor barrier and might make some noise when stepping on it. also, the hole would have to be fairly large to get the sand under it. Surely someone knows of a way.
 
  #4  
Old 04-08-09, 02:12 PM
flooryou's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 52
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The nice thing here is that floating floors come up very easy, so it looks like you get a second chance to do the job right this time. I suggest marking out the hollow spots and taking a picture so you can reference it when you are doing the floor prep.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: